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undergraduate thesis: Developmental trajectories in toddlers' phonology

TitleDevelopmental trajectories in toddlers' phonology
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
AbstractThis study investigated the prevalence of four developmental trajectories in toddlers’ phonology (persistent impairment, spontaneous catch-up, deterioration and age-appropriate) and the possible phonological differences between them. Forty-one toddlers were assessed twice at 6-month intervals. Their phonological abilities were evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicated that less than 17% of the toddlers with speech sound disorder caught up, even though some showed some improvement. No participant suffered any deterioration in speech. In terms of quantitative measures, toddlers with age-appropriate abilities differed significantly from those with speech sound disorders. No significant difference was found between the persistent and spontaneous catch-up groups. Toddlers who caught up spontaneously, however, produced no vowel errors, stopping, deaspiration or other unclassified atypical processes. Phonological patterns seem in fact to distinguish toddlers who catch up spontaneously from those who have persistent impairment. Clinical implications concerning timing and candidacy for intervention are also discussed.
Description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."
Includes bibliographical references (p. 26-30).
Thesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
SubjectToddlers -- Language.
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, Wing-hanen_HK
dc.contributor.author劉泳嫻zh_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-01T01:14:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-01T01:14:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173714-
dc.description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 26-30).en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the prevalence of four developmental trajectories in toddlers’ phonology (persistent impairment, spontaneous catch-up, deterioration and age-appropriate) and the possible phonological differences between them. Forty-one toddlers were assessed twice at 6-month intervals. Their phonological abilities were evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicated that less than 17% of the toddlers with speech sound disorder caught up, even though some showed some improvement. No participant suffered any deterioration in speech. In terms of quantitative measures, toddlers with age-appropriate abilities differed significantly from those with speech sound disorders. No significant difference was found between the persistent and spontaneous catch-up groups. Toddlers who caught up spontaneously, however, produced no vowel errors, stopping, deaspiration or other unclassified atypical processes. Phonological patterns seem in fact to distinguish toddlers who catch up spontaneously from those who have persistent impairment. Clinical implications concerning timing and candidacy for intervention are also discussed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.en_US
dc.subject.lcshToddlers -- Language.en_US
dc.titleDevelopmental trajectories in toddlers' phonologyen_HK
dc.typeUG_Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.hkulb4813080en_US
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.thesislevelBacheloren_US
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US

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