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Undergraduate Thesis: The effects of feedback on the speech motor task of simulating hypernasality
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TitleThe effects of feedback on the speech motor task of simulating hypernasality
 
AuthorsLai, King-lok
黎敬樂
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of feedback on the learning of a novel speech task: simulating hypernasality. Forty participants (20 male, 20 female; age range 18-35 years) were randomly assigned into four groups, receiving different combinations of feedback type (visual or verbal) and relative frequency of knowledge of results (100% or 50%). The participants practiced hypernasal production of syllables, words and a passage during acquisition. Their performances at baseline, immediate retention, delayed retention and transfer were assessed with three different types of connected speech stimuli. The results showed that learning was took place in all feedback conditions. However, no significant difference was found across different feedback type and feedback frequency. The findings indicated that velopharyngeal closure during speech can be controlled voluntarily upon practice with appropriate feedback rendered. The findings also shed light on the treatment of hypernasality and on speech motor learning.
 
Description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."
Includes bibliographical references (p. 26-30).
Thesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.
 
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
 
SubjectNasality (Phonetics)
Motor cortex.
Speech -- Physiological aspects.
 
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLai, King-lok
 
dc.contributor.author黎敬樂
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-01T01:14:03Z
 
dc.date.available2012-11-01T01:14:03Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of feedback on the learning of a novel speech task: simulating hypernasality. Forty participants (20 male, 20 female; age range 18-35 years) were randomly assigned into four groups, receiving different combinations of feedback type (visual or verbal) and relative frequency of knowledge of results (100% or 50%). The participants practiced hypernasal production of syllables, words and a passage during acquisition. Their performances at baseline, immediate retention, delayed retention and transfer were assessed with three different types of connected speech stimuli. The results showed that learning was took place in all feedback conditions. However, no significant difference was found across different feedback type and feedback frequency. The findings indicated that velopharyngeal closure during speech can be controlled voluntarily upon practice with appropriate feedback rendered. The findings also shed light on the treatment of hypernasality and on speech motor learning.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."
 
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 26-30).
 
dc.descriptionThesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciences
 
dc.description.thesislevelBachelor's
 
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4813043
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173707
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.subject.lcshNasality (Phonetics)
 
dc.subject.lcshMotor cortex.
 
dc.subject.lcshSpeech -- Physiological aspects.
 
dc.titleThe effects of feedback on the speech motor task of simulating hypernasality
 
dc.typeUG_Thesis
 
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<item><contributor.author>Lai, King-lok</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>&#40654;&#25964;&#27138;</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-11-01T01:14:03Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-11-01T01:14:03Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2010</date.issued>
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<description>&quot;A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010.&quot;</description>
<description>Includes bibliographical references (p. 26-30).</description>
<description>Thesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.</description>
<description.abstract>The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of feedback on the learning of a
novel speech task: simulating hypernasality. Forty participants (20 male, 20 female; age
range 18-35 years) were randomly assigned into four groups, receiving different
combinations of feedback type (visual or verbal) and relative frequency of knowledge of
results (100% or 50%). The participants practiced hypernasal production of syllables, words
and a passage during acquisition. Their performances at baseline, immediate retention,
delayed retention and transfer were assessed with three different types of connected speech
stimuli. The results showed that learning was took place in all feedback conditions. However,
no significant difference was found across different feedback type and feedback frequency.
The findings indicated that velopharyngeal closure during speech can be controlled
voluntarily upon practice with appropriate feedback rendered. The findings also shed light
on the treatment of hypernasality and on speech motor learning.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)</publisher>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<rights>The author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.</rights>
<subject.lcsh>Nasality (Phonetics)</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Motor cortex.</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Speech -- Physiological aspects.</subject.lcsh>
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