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Article: Gestational trophoblastic disease

TitleGestational trophoblastic disease
Authors
KeywordsPlacental site trophoblastic tumour
Hydatidiform mole
Gestational trophoblastic meoplasia
Fertility preservation
Choriocarcinoma
Issue Date2012
PublisherBailliere Tindall. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bpobgyn
Citation
Best Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 2012, v. 26 n. 3, p. 357-370 How to Cite?
AbstractMost women with gestational trophoblastic disease are of reproductive age. Because the disease is readily treatable with favourable prognosis, fertility becomes an important issue. Hydatidiform mole is a relatively benign disease, and most women do not require chemotherapy after uterine evacuation. A single uterine evacuation has no significant effect on future fertility, and pregnancy outcomes in subsequent pregnancies are comparable to that of the general population, despite a slight increased risk of developing molar pregnancy again. If women develop persistent trophoblastic disease, single or combined chemotherapy will be needed. Although ovarian dysfunction after chemotherapy is a theoretical risk, a term live birth rate of higher than 70% has been reported without increased risk of fetal abnormalities. Successful pregnancies have also been reported after choriocarcinoma. Only a few case reports have been published on fertility-sparing treatment in placental-site trophoblastic tumour, and the successful rate is about 67%. Women are advised to refrain from pregnancy for at least 6 months after a molar pregnancy, and at least 12 months after a gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Most of the contraceptive methods do not have an adverse effect on the return of fertility. Finally, at least one-half of these women suffer from some form of psychological or sexual problems. Careful counselling and involvement of a multi-disciplinary team are mandated. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173373
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.291
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.123
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:29:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:29:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationBest Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 2012, v. 26 n. 3, p. 357-370en_US
dc.identifier.issn1521-6934en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173373-
dc.description.abstractMost women with gestational trophoblastic disease are of reproductive age. Because the disease is readily treatable with favourable prognosis, fertility becomes an important issue. Hydatidiform mole is a relatively benign disease, and most women do not require chemotherapy after uterine evacuation. A single uterine evacuation has no significant effect on future fertility, and pregnancy outcomes in subsequent pregnancies are comparable to that of the general population, despite a slight increased risk of developing molar pregnancy again. If women develop persistent trophoblastic disease, single or combined chemotherapy will be needed. Although ovarian dysfunction after chemotherapy is a theoretical risk, a term live birth rate of higher than 70% has been reported without increased risk of fetal abnormalities. Successful pregnancies have also been reported after choriocarcinoma. Only a few case reports have been published on fertility-sparing treatment in placental-site trophoblastic tumour, and the successful rate is about 67%. Women are advised to refrain from pregnancy for at least 6 months after a molar pregnancy, and at least 12 months after a gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Most of the contraceptive methods do not have an adverse effect on the return of fertility. Finally, at least one-half of these women suffer from some form of psychological or sexual problems. Careful counselling and involvement of a multi-disciplinary team are mandated. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBailliere Tindall. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bpobgynen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBest Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecologyen_US
dc.subjectPlacental site trophoblastic tumouren_US
dc.subjectHydatidiform moleen_US
dc.subjectGestational trophoblastic meoplasiaen_US
dc.subjectFertility preservationen_US
dc.subjectChoriocarcinomaen_US
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshFertility preservation-
dc.subject.meshGestational trophoblastic disease - complications - psychology - therapy-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm recurrence, Local - therapy-
dc.subject.meshOrgan sparing treatments-
dc.titleGestational trophoblastic diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, KY: tseky@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS: hysngan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2011.11.009en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22285526-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860214212en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros198820-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84860214212&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage357en_US
dc.identifier.epage370en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303634400007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, KY=8876026900en_US

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