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Article: Left ventricular noncompaction in children
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TitleLeft ventricular noncompaction in children
 
AuthorsKoh, C1
Lee, PW1
Yung, TC1
Lun, KS1
Cheung, YF1
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/chd
 
CitationCongenital Heart Disease, 2009, v. 4 n. 4, p. 288-294 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-0803.2009.00269.x
 
AbstractObjective. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an uncommon type of cardiomyopathy in children. We sought to determine the clinical presentations and outcomes of children diagnosed to have LVNC. Design. The case records of children diagnosed to have LVNC between 1999 and 2007 were reviewed. The diagnosis was based on echocardiographic finding of a thick noncompacted myocardium layer characterized by a trabecular meshwork with deep endomyocardial spaces. Results. Ten patients (seven males) were diagnosed to have LVNC at a median age of 2 years (range, 7 days to 12 years). Seven patients had isolated LVNC while three had associated structural congenital heart diseases. The right ventricle was also involved in two patients. Clinical presentations included congestive heart failure in eight patients, asymptomatic heart murmur in one, and syncope with exercise intolerance in one. At presentation, cardiomegaly was found in nine patients, electrocardiographic abnormalities in nine, and impaired LV contraction in six. Eight patients received anti-heart failure medications. Three patients died at a median of 1.5 years after diagnosis, two died suddenly of unknown causes, and one of heart failure. The seven surviving patients were followed up for a median of 2 years (range, 2 months to 3 years). Three patients developed cardiac arrhythmias. The LV function improved in three patients and worsened in one on follow-up. None of the patients developed thromboembolic complications. Conclusions. Left ventricular noncompaction in children is a heterogeneous condition. Long-term follow-up for development of progressive LV dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias is indicated. © 2009 Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
ISSN1747-079X
2013 Impact Factor: 1.202
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-0803.2009.00269.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000207893700014
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorKoh, C
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, PW
 
dc.contributor.authorYung, TC
 
dc.contributor.authorLun, KS
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YF
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:08:24Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:08:24Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractObjective. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an uncommon type of cardiomyopathy in children. We sought to determine the clinical presentations and outcomes of children diagnosed to have LVNC. Design. The case records of children diagnosed to have LVNC between 1999 and 2007 were reviewed. The diagnosis was based on echocardiographic finding of a thick noncompacted myocardium layer characterized by a trabecular meshwork with deep endomyocardial spaces. Results. Ten patients (seven males) were diagnosed to have LVNC at a median age of 2 years (range, 7 days to 12 years). Seven patients had isolated LVNC while three had associated structural congenital heart diseases. The right ventricle was also involved in two patients. Clinical presentations included congestive heart failure in eight patients, asymptomatic heart murmur in one, and syncope with exercise intolerance in one. At presentation, cardiomegaly was found in nine patients, electrocardiographic abnormalities in nine, and impaired LV contraction in six. Eight patients received anti-heart failure medications. Three patients died at a median of 1.5 years after diagnosis, two died suddenly of unknown causes, and one of heart failure. The seven surviving patients were followed up for a median of 2 years (range, 2 months to 3 years). Three patients developed cardiac arrhythmias. The LV function improved in three patients and worsened in one on follow-up. None of the patients developed thromboembolic complications. Conclusions. Left ventricular noncompaction in children is a heterogeneous condition. Long-term follow-up for development of progressive LV dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias is indicated. © 2009 Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationCongenital Heart Disease, 2009, v. 4 n. 4, p. 288-294 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-0803.2009.00269.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5490354
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-0803.2009.00269.x
 
dc.identifier.epage294
 
dc.identifier.hkuros160073
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000207893700014
 
dc.identifier.issn1747-079X
2013 Impact Factor: 1.202
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid19664035
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68349090331
 
dc.identifier.spage288
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170419
 
dc.identifier.volume4
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/chd
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofCongenital Heart Disease
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshCardiomyopathies - Therapy - Ultrasonography
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
 
dc.subject.meshFatal Outcome
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHeart Defects, Congenital - Therapy - Ultrasonography
 
dc.subject.meshHeart Failure - Therapy - Ultrasonography
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInfant
 
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshVentricular Dysfunction, Left - Therapy - Ultrasonography
 
dc.titleLeft ventricular noncompaction in children
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong