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Article: BP and arterial distensibility in children with primary snoring

TitleBP and arterial distensibility in children with primary snoring
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAmerican College of Chest Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.chestjournal.org
Citation
Chest, 2003, v. 123 n. 5, p. 1561-1566 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy objective: While previous studies have suggested an association between obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular complications, the effects of primary snoring in children on daytime systemic BP and arterial distensibility remain unknown. Design and patients: To determine the effects of primary snoring on BP and peripheral conduit artery distensibility, 30 children with primary snoring were studied at an age of 9.5 ± 2.8 years (mean ± SD). Systemic BP was measured using an automated device, while brachioradial arterial distensibility was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is inversely related to the square root of distensibility. The results were compared to those of 30 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and body size. Results: As compared to control subjects, children with primary snoring had significantly higher systolic BP (112 ± 10 mm Hg vs 105 ± 8 mm Hg, p = 0.001), diastolic BP (60 ± 7 mm Hg vs 53 ± 9 mm Hg, p = 0.004), and mean BP (81 ± 7 mm Hg vs 71 ± 8 mm Hg, p < 0.001). Likewise, those with primary snoring had significantly higher PWV (9.7 ± 1.6 m/s vs 7.9 ± 2.0 m/s, p = 0.001). Multiple regression identified age, body mass index (BMI), and primary snoring as significant determinants of systemic BP; however, primary snoring is the only significant determinant of PWV. Regardless of the BMI, systemic BP and PWV remained significantly higher in children with primary snoring. Conclusion: Children with primary snoring have increased daytime systemic BP and reduced arterial distensibility, which may jeopardize long-term cardiovascular health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170328
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.94
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.176
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, DKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:07:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:07:31Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationChest, 2003, v. 123 n. 5, p. 1561-1566en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-3692en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170328-
dc.description.abstractStudy objective: While previous studies have suggested an association between obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular complications, the effects of primary snoring in children on daytime systemic BP and arterial distensibility remain unknown. Design and patients: To determine the effects of primary snoring on BP and peripheral conduit artery distensibility, 30 children with primary snoring were studied at an age of 9.5 ± 2.8 years (mean ± SD). Systemic BP was measured using an automated device, while brachioradial arterial distensibility was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is inversely related to the square root of distensibility. The results were compared to those of 30 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and body size. Results: As compared to control subjects, children with primary snoring had significantly higher systolic BP (112 ± 10 mm Hg vs 105 ± 8 mm Hg, p = 0.001), diastolic BP (60 ± 7 mm Hg vs 53 ± 9 mm Hg, p = 0.004), and mean BP (81 ± 7 mm Hg vs 71 ± 8 mm Hg, p < 0.001). Likewise, those with primary snoring had significantly higher PWV (9.7 ± 1.6 m/s vs 7.9 ± 2.0 m/s, p = 0.001). Multiple regression identified age, body mass index (BMI), and primary snoring as significant determinants of systemic BP; however, primary snoring is the only significant determinant of PWV. Regardless of the BMI, systemic BP and PWV remained significantly higher in children with primary snoring. Conclusion: Children with primary snoring have increased daytime systemic BP and reduced arterial distensibility, which may jeopardize long-term cardiovascular health.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican College of Chest Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.chestjournal.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChesten_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshBrachial Artery - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshElasticityen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotoplethysmographyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolysomnographyen_US
dc.subject.meshPulseen_US
dc.subject.meshRadial Artery - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSnoring - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleBP and arterial distensibility in children with primary snoringen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, YF:xfcheung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, YF=rp00382en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1378/chest.123.5.1561en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12740274-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0038555354en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros76474-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0038555354&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume123en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage1561en_US
dc.identifier.epage1566en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182773000038-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, KL=7102194170en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, DKK=7201645744en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, YF=7202111067en_US

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