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Article: Bundles in academic discourse

TitleBundles in academic discourse
Authors
KeywordsLinguistics
Issue Date2012
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=APL
Citation
Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 2012, v. 32, p. 150-169 How to Cite?
AbstractAutomated, frequency-driven approaches to identifying commonly used word combinations have become an important aspect of academic discourse analysis and English for academic purposes (EAP) teaching during the last 10 years. Referred to as clusters, chunks, or bundles, these sequences are certainly formulaic, but in the sense that they are simply extended collocations that appear more frequently than expected by chance, helping to shape meanings in specific contexts and contributing to our sense of coherence in a text. More recently, work has extended to “concgrams,” or noncontiguous word groupings where there is lexical and positional variation. Together, these lexical patterns are pervasive in academic language use and a key component of fluent linguistic production, marking out novice and expert use in a range of genres. This article discusses the emerging research which demonstrates the importance of formulaic language in both academic speech and writing and the extent to which it varies in frequency, form, and function by mode, discipline, and genre. Abstract by, Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166125
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.739
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.753
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:29:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:29:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnual Review of Applied Linguistics, 2012, v. 32, p. 150-169en_US
dc.identifier.issn0267-1905-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166125-
dc.description.abstractAutomated, frequency-driven approaches to identifying commonly used word combinations have become an important aspect of academic discourse analysis and English for academic purposes (EAP) teaching during the last 10 years. Referred to as clusters, chunks, or bundles, these sequences are certainly formulaic, but in the sense that they are simply extended collocations that appear more frequently than expected by chance, helping to shape meanings in specific contexts and contributing to our sense of coherence in a text. More recently, work has extended to “concgrams,” or noncontiguous word groupings where there is lexical and positional variation. Together, these lexical patterns are pervasive in academic language use and a key component of fluent linguistic production, marking out novice and expert use in a range of genres. This article discusses the emerging research which demonstrates the importance of formulaic language in both academic speech and writing and the extent to which it varies in frequency, form, and function by mode, discipline, and genre. Abstract by, Cambridge University Press.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=APL-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Review of Applied Linguisticsen_US
dc.rightsAnnual Review of Applied Linguistics. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLinguistics-
dc.titleBundles in academic discourseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K: khyland@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, K=rp01133en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0267190512000037-
dc.identifier.hkuros207166en_US
dc.identifier.volume32en_US
dc.identifier.spage150en_US
dc.identifier.epage169en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000311905800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablehys 130308-

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