File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Self efficacy predicts adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy in obstructive sleep apnea

TitleSelf efficacy predicts adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy in obstructive sleep apnea
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Respiratory diseases
Issue Date2012
PublisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org
Citation
The 2012 International Conference of the American Thoracic Society, San Francisco, CA., 18-23 May 2012. In American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2012, meeting abstracts, p. A3846 How to Cite?
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, low CPAP adherence limits its treatment effectiveness, and it has been recognized as a contributing factor to poor physiological and psychosocial health in untreated or under-treated OSA patients. This study investigated the relationships between CPAP adherence, biomedical and cognitive factors in subjects with OSA. METHODS: Subjects who were newly diagnosed of OSA and CPAP therapy naïve were recruited. Their demographic, anthropometric and physiological data were obtained after the in-laboratory sleep studies. They filled in Self Efficacy Measure for Sleep Apnea (SEMSA) questionnaire (measuring cognitive perception of risk, outcome expectancies and self-efficacy) in addition to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Fixed CPAP pressure was prescribed after in-laboratory titration as indicated. CPAP adherence was objectively measured at 1 and 4 weeks after CPAP use. RESULTS: 91 subjects (14 females) were evaluated, with mean ± SD age of 52 ± 9 years, body mass index (BMI) of 29 ± 5.6 kg/m2, ESS score of 9 ± 5, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 28.7 (21, 53) /hr. Mean days of CPAP use (>= 4hrs/day) in 1 and 4 weeks were 3.9 ± 2.7 days and 18.9 ± 9.5 days, respectively. On univariate analysis, there were no significant associations between CPAP adherence and clinical parameters (age, gender, BMI, sleep parameters), prescribed CPAP pressure and sleepiness. Self-efficacy score of cognitive perception measured before the start of CPAP therapy was associated with CPAP use in 1 week (ß=1.272 (0.556, 1.987)) and 4 weeks (ß= 4.163 (1.462, 6.863)), but not risk perception and outcome expectancies. Multiple linear analysis showed self-efficacy score is a significant predictor of CPAP adherence at 1 and 4 weeks after adjusting for age, gender and OSA severity. CONCLUSIONS: Self efficacy score of cognitive perception is a significant predictor of adherence to CPAP therapy in OSA.
DescriptionB108 Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sleep APNEA - Poster Discussion Session
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165425
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 11.986

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, AYKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, JCMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSvikis, DPen_US
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:18:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:18:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2012 International Conference of the American Thoracic Society, San Francisco, CA., 18-23 May 2012. In American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2012, meeting abstracts, p. A3846en_US
dc.identifier.issn1073-449Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165425-
dc.descriptionB108 Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sleep APNEA - Poster Discussion Session-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, low CPAP adherence limits its treatment effectiveness, and it has been recognized as a contributing factor to poor physiological and psychosocial health in untreated or under-treated OSA patients. This study investigated the relationships between CPAP adherence, biomedical and cognitive factors in subjects with OSA. METHODS: Subjects who were newly diagnosed of OSA and CPAP therapy naïve were recruited. Their demographic, anthropometric and physiological data were obtained after the in-laboratory sleep studies. They filled in Self Efficacy Measure for Sleep Apnea (SEMSA) questionnaire (measuring cognitive perception of risk, outcome expectancies and self-efficacy) in addition to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Fixed CPAP pressure was prescribed after in-laboratory titration as indicated. CPAP adherence was objectively measured at 1 and 4 weeks after CPAP use. RESULTS: 91 subjects (14 females) were evaluated, with mean ± SD age of 52 ± 9 years, body mass index (BMI) of 29 ± 5.6 kg/m2, ESS score of 9 ± 5, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 28.7 (21, 53) /hr. Mean days of CPAP use (>= 4hrs/day) in 1 and 4 weeks were 3.9 ± 2.7 days and 18.9 ± 9.5 days, respectively. On univariate analysis, there were no significant associations between CPAP adherence and clinical parameters (age, gender, BMI, sleep parameters), prescribed CPAP pressure and sleepiness. Self-efficacy score of cognitive perception measured before the start of CPAP therapy was associated with CPAP use in 1 week (ß=1.272 (0.556, 1.987)) and 4 weeks (ß= 4.163 (1.462, 6.863)), but not risk perception and outcome expectancies. Multiple linear analysis showed self-efficacy score is a significant predictor of CPAP adherence at 1 and 4 weeks after adjusting for age, gender and OSA severity. CONCLUSIONS: Self efficacy score of cognitive perception is a significant predictor of adherence to CPAP therapy in OSA.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicineen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectRespiratory diseases-
dc.titleSelf efficacy predicts adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy in obstructive sleep apneaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, AYK: agneslai@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, JCM: lamcmj@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1164/ajrccm-conference.2012.185.1_MeetingAbstracts.A3846-
dc.identifier.hkuros207019en_US
dc.identifier.volumemeeting abstractsen_US
dc.identifier.spageA3846en_US
dc.identifier.epageA3846en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130917-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats