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Article: Pathophysiological changes to the peritoneal membrane during PD-related peritonitis: The role of mesothelial cells

TitlePathophysiological changes to the peritoneal membrane during PD-related peritonitis: The role of mesothelial cells
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/mi/index.html
Citation
Mediators Of Inflammation, 2012, v. 2012, article no. 484167 How to Cite?
AbstractThe success of peritoneal dialysis (PD) is dependent on the structural and functional integrity of the peritoneal membrane. The mesothelium lines the peritoneal membrane and is the first line of defense against chemical and/or bacterial insult. Peritonitis remains a major complication of PD and is a predominant cause of technique failure, morbidity and mortality amongst PD patients. With appropriate antibiotic treatment, peritonitis resolves without further complications, but in some PD patients excessive peritoneal inflammatory responses lead to mesothelial cell exfoliation and thickening of the submesothelium, resulting in peritoneal fibrosis and sclerosis. The detrimental changes in the peritoneal membrane structure and function correlate with the number and severity of peritonitis episodes and the need for catheter removal. There is evidence that despite clinical resolution of peritonitis, increased levels of inflammatory and fibrotic mediators may persist in the peritoneal cavity, signifying persistent injury to the mesothelial cells. This review will describe the structural and functional changes that occur in the peritoneal membrane during peritonitis and how mesothelial cells contribute to these changes and respond to infection. The latter part of the review discusses the potential of mesothelial cell transplantation and genetic manipulation in the preservation of the peritoneal membrane. Copyright 2012 Susan Yung and Tak Mao Chan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163491
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.418
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.370
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYung, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:32:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:32:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationMediators Of Inflammation, 2012, v. 2012, article no. 484167en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-9351en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163491-
dc.description.abstractThe success of peritoneal dialysis (PD) is dependent on the structural and functional integrity of the peritoneal membrane. The mesothelium lines the peritoneal membrane and is the first line of defense against chemical and/or bacterial insult. Peritonitis remains a major complication of PD and is a predominant cause of technique failure, morbidity and mortality amongst PD patients. With appropriate antibiotic treatment, peritonitis resolves without further complications, but in some PD patients excessive peritoneal inflammatory responses lead to mesothelial cell exfoliation and thickening of the submesothelium, resulting in peritoneal fibrosis and sclerosis. The detrimental changes in the peritoneal membrane structure and function correlate with the number and severity of peritonitis episodes and the need for catheter removal. There is evidence that despite clinical resolution of peritonitis, increased levels of inflammatory and fibrotic mediators may persist in the peritoneal cavity, signifying persistent injury to the mesothelial cells. This review will describe the structural and functional changes that occur in the peritoneal membrane during peritonitis and how mesothelial cells contribute to these changes and respond to infection. The latter part of the review discusses the potential of mesothelial cell transplantation and genetic manipulation in the preservation of the peritoneal membrane. Copyright 2012 Susan Yung and Tak Mao Chan.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/mi/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofMediators of Inflammationen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePathophysiological changes to the peritoneal membrane during PD-related peritonitis: The role of mesothelial cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYung, S:ssyyung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM:dtmchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYung, S=rp00455en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2012/484167en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22577250-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861028443en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros204921-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861028443&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume2012en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303709600001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYung, S=22636568800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_US

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