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Article: The neglected hepatitis C virus genotypes 4, 5 and 6: An international consensus report

TitleThe neglected hepatitis C virus genotypes 4, 5 and 6: An international consensus report
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1478-3223&site=1
Citation
Liver International, 2010, v. 30 n. 3, p. 342-355 How to Cite?
AbstractHepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 4, 5 and 6 represent >20% of all HCV cases worldwide. HCV-4 is mainly seen in Egypt, where it represents 90% of all HCV cases. Antischistosomal therapy was the main cause of contamination there, followed by procedures performed by informal providers and traditional healers such as dental care, wound treatment, circumcision, deliveries, excision and scarification. It is also highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Middle East. In Europe, its prevalence has recently increased particularly among intravenous drug users and in immigrants. HCV-5 is mainly found in South Africa, where it represents 40% of all HCV genotypes, but four pockets of HCV-5 were found in France, Spain, Syria and Belgium and sporadic cases were found elsewhere. The mode of transmission is mainly iatrogenic and transfusion. HCV-6 is found in Hong Kong, Vietnam, Thailand and Myanmar and also in American and Australian from Asian origin. The response to treatment in HCV-4 is intermediate between HCV-1 and HCV-2 and HCV-3. A sustained viral response is achieved in 43-70% with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. It is higher in Egyptians than Europeans and Africans and is negatively related to insulin resistance and to the severity of fibrosis. It increases to >80% with 24 weeks of therapy only if a rapid virological response is achieved. In HCV-5, a sustained virological response is achieved in >60% with 48 weeks of therapy. HCV-6 is also considered an easy-to-treat genotype, leading to a response in 60-85% of cases. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163303
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.47
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.677
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAntaki, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorCraxi, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorKamal, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoucari, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Merwe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaffar, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorGadano, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorZein, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorPawlotsky, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeathcote, EJen_US
dc.contributor.authorDusheiko, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarcellin, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:29:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:29:52Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationLiver International, 2010, v. 30 n. 3, p. 342-355en_US
dc.identifier.issn1478-3223en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163303-
dc.description.abstractHepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 4, 5 and 6 represent >20% of all HCV cases worldwide. HCV-4 is mainly seen in Egypt, where it represents 90% of all HCV cases. Antischistosomal therapy was the main cause of contamination there, followed by procedures performed by informal providers and traditional healers such as dental care, wound treatment, circumcision, deliveries, excision and scarification. It is also highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Middle East. In Europe, its prevalence has recently increased particularly among intravenous drug users and in immigrants. HCV-5 is mainly found in South Africa, where it represents 40% of all HCV genotypes, but four pockets of HCV-5 were found in France, Spain, Syria and Belgium and sporadic cases were found elsewhere. The mode of transmission is mainly iatrogenic and transfusion. HCV-6 is found in Hong Kong, Vietnam, Thailand and Myanmar and also in American and Australian from Asian origin. The response to treatment in HCV-4 is intermediate between HCV-1 and HCV-2 and HCV-3. A sustained viral response is achieved in 43-70% with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. It is higher in Egyptians than Europeans and Africans and is negatively related to insulin resistance and to the severity of fibrosis. It increases to >80% with 24 weeks of therapy only if a rapid virological response is achieved. In HCV-5, a sustained virological response is achieved in >60% with 48 weeks of therapy. HCV-6 is also considered an easy-to-treat genotype, leading to a response in 60-85% of cases. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1478-3223&site=1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofLiver Internationalen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHepacivirus - Classification - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.titleThe neglected hepatitis C virus genotypes 4, 5 and 6: An international consensus reporten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, CL:hrmelcl@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, CL=rp00314en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1478-3231.2009.02188.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid20015149-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950624760en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros181155-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950624760&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage342en_US
dc.identifier.epage355en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273731500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAntaki, N=23990372700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCraxi, A=7006676701en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKamal, S=7006560985en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMoucari, R=22234756500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan der Merwe, S=7003839470en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaffar, S=26029833700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGadano, A=7003915650en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZein, N=7007142131en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, CL=7403086396en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPawlotsky, J=34571896700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeathcote, EJ=16232754400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDusheiko, G=7006885162en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarcellin, P=7102079502en_US

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