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Article: A randomised controlled trial of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on insulin sensitivity in obstructive sleep apnoea
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TitleA randomised controlled trial of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on insulin sensitivity in obstructive sleep apnoea
 
AuthorsLam, JCM1
Lam, B1
Yao, TJ1
Lai, AYK1
Ooi, CG1
Tam, S2
Lam, KSL1 1
Ip, MSM1 2
 
KeywordsInsulin sensitivity
Nasal continuous positive airway pressure
Obstructive sleep apnoea
Randomised controlled trial
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherEuropean Respiratory Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://erj.ersjournals.com
 
CitationEuropean Respiratory Journal, 2010, v. 35 n. 1, p. 138-145 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00047709
 
AbstractThe effects of treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on glucose metabolism have been investigated previously with conflicting results. This study evaluated the impact of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment of OSA on insulin sensitivity. Males with moderate/severe OSA and no significant comorbidity were randomised to a therapeutic or sham nCPAP treatment group for 1 week and then reassessed. Those who received therapeutic nCPAP were further evaluated at 12 weeks. Insulin sensitivity (Kitt) was estimated by the short insulin tolerance test. Other evaluations included blood pressure, metabolic profile, urinary catecholamines and intra-abdominal fat. In total, 61 Chinese subjects were randomised. 31 subjects receiving therapeutic nCPAP showed an increase in Kitt (6.6±2.9 to 7.6±3.2 %·min -1; p50.017), while the 30 patients on sham CPAP had no significant change, and the changes in Kitt were different between the two groups (p=0.022). At 12 weeks, improvement in Kitt was seen in 20 subjects with BMI ≥25 kg·m -2 (median (interquartile range) 28.3 (26.6-31.5); p50.044), but not in the nine subjects with BMI<25 kg·m -2, or the entire group. The findings indicate that therapeutic nCPAP treatment of OSA for 1 week improved insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic males, and the improvement appeared to be maintained after 12 weeks of treatment in those with moderate obesity. Copyright©ERS Journals Ltd 2010.
 
ISSN0903-1936
2012 Impact Factor: 6.355
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.433
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00047709
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, JCM
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, B
 
dc.contributor.authorYao, TJ
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, AYK
 
dc.contributor.authorOoi, CG
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL
 
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSM
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:29:43Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:29:43Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThe effects of treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on glucose metabolism have been investigated previously with conflicting results. This study evaluated the impact of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment of OSA on insulin sensitivity. Males with moderate/severe OSA and no significant comorbidity were randomised to a therapeutic or sham nCPAP treatment group for 1 week and then reassessed. Those who received therapeutic nCPAP were further evaluated at 12 weeks. Insulin sensitivity (Kitt) was estimated by the short insulin tolerance test. Other evaluations included blood pressure, metabolic profile, urinary catecholamines and intra-abdominal fat. In total, 61 Chinese subjects were randomised. 31 subjects receiving therapeutic nCPAP showed an increase in Kitt (6.6±2.9 to 7.6±3.2 %·min -1; p50.017), while the 30 patients on sham CPAP had no significant change, and the changes in Kitt were different between the two groups (p=0.022). At 12 weeks, improvement in Kitt was seen in 20 subjects with BMI ≥25 kg·m -2 (median (interquartile range) 28.3 (26.6-31.5); p50.044), but not in the nine subjects with BMI<25 kg·m -2, or the entire group. The findings indicate that therapeutic nCPAP treatment of OSA for 1 week improved insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic males, and the improvement appeared to be maintained after 12 weeks of treatment in those with moderate obesity. Copyright©ERS Journals Ltd 2010.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Respiratory Journal, 2010, v. 35 n. 1, p. 138-145 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00047709
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00047709
 
dc.identifier.epage145
 
dc.identifier.hkuros159900
 
dc.identifier.hkuros182549
 
dc.identifier.issn0903-1936
2012 Impact Factor: 6.355
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.433
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid19608589
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75149134456
 
dc.identifier.spage138
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163291
 
dc.identifier.volume35
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherEuropean Respiratory Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://erj.ersjournals.com
 
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland
 
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Respiratory Journal
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshContinuous Positive Airway Pressure
 
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Method
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInsulin - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive - Metabolism - Therapy
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.subjectInsulin sensitivity
 
dc.subjectNasal continuous positive airway pressure
 
dc.subjectObstructive sleep apnoea
 
dc.subjectRandomised controlled trial
 
dc.titleA randomised controlled trial of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on insulin sensitivity in obstructive sleep apnoea
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong