File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: The duration of lamivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis b: Cessation vs. continuation of treatment after HBeAg seroconversion
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleThe duration of lamivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis b: Cessation vs. continuation of treatment after HBeAg seroconversion
 
AuthorsFung, J2
Lai, CL2
Tanaka, Y1
Mizokami, M2
Yuen, J2
Wong, DKH2
Yuen, MF2
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2009, v. 104 n. 8, p. 1940-1946 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2009.200
 
AbstractOBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the virological and biochemical relapse rates in Asian chronic hepatitis B patients with lamivudine-induced hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, between those who stopped therapy after HBeAg seroconversion and those who continued to receive lamivudine.METHODS:All patients with lamivudine-induced HBeAg seroconversion were included. Patients who stopped lamivudine after HBeAg seroconversion (n22) were compared with 79 patients who continued to receive lamivudine (n79). Demographic, virological, and biochemical parameters were recorded at baseline, and throughout the duration of follow-up.RESULTS:In patients who stopped lamivudine, the median follow-up after stopping lamivudine was 20 months. Of these patients, 14 (64%) had virological rebound, with a cumulative incidence of 82% at 4 years. There was no significant difference in number of flares between patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA at the time of stopping lamivudine compared with that in patients with either abnormal ALT, detectable HBV DNA, or both (P0.73). The cumulative incidence of HBeAg seroreversion and ALT flares at 5 years after stopping lamivudine was 9 and 44%, respectively. Of the 79 patients who continued with lamivudine, 62 (78%) had undetectable HBV DNA at the time of last follow-up, whereas no patients had undetectable HBV DNA after stopping lamivudine (P<0.001). The cumulative incidence of ALT flares at 5 years was 16% (P<0.001 compared with those who stopped taking lamivudine). After a median treatment duration of 79 months, lamivudine-resistant mutations occurred in eight patients (10%).CONCLUSIONS:In Asian HBeAg-positive patients, continuing with lamivudine after achieving HBeAg seroconversion was associated with a higher proportion of undetectable HBV DNA and a lower number of ALT flares, when compared with those with cessation of lamivudine. In patients who achieved HBeAg seroconversion with lamivudine, the resistance rate was not high when treatment was continued after HBeAg seroconversion. © 2009 by the American College of Gastroenterology.
 
ISSN0002-9270
2012 Impact Factor: 7.553
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.574
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2009.200
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000268965300008
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorFung, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorMizokami, M
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, J
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, DKH
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MF
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:29:17Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:29:17Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the virological and biochemical relapse rates in Asian chronic hepatitis B patients with lamivudine-induced hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, between those who stopped therapy after HBeAg seroconversion and those who continued to receive lamivudine.METHODS:All patients with lamivudine-induced HBeAg seroconversion were included. Patients who stopped lamivudine after HBeAg seroconversion (n22) were compared with 79 patients who continued to receive lamivudine (n79). Demographic, virological, and biochemical parameters were recorded at baseline, and throughout the duration of follow-up.RESULTS:In patients who stopped lamivudine, the median follow-up after stopping lamivudine was 20 months. Of these patients, 14 (64%) had virological rebound, with a cumulative incidence of 82% at 4 years. There was no significant difference in number of flares between patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA at the time of stopping lamivudine compared with that in patients with either abnormal ALT, detectable HBV DNA, or both (P0.73). The cumulative incidence of HBeAg seroreversion and ALT flares at 5 years after stopping lamivudine was 9 and 44%, respectively. Of the 79 patients who continued with lamivudine, 62 (78%) had undetectable HBV DNA at the time of last follow-up, whereas no patients had undetectable HBV DNA after stopping lamivudine (P<0.001). The cumulative incidence of ALT flares at 5 years was 16% (P<0.001 compared with those who stopped taking lamivudine). After a median treatment duration of 79 months, lamivudine-resistant mutations occurred in eight patients (10%).CONCLUSIONS:In Asian HBeAg-positive patients, continuing with lamivudine after achieving HBeAg seroconversion was associated with a higher proportion of undetectable HBV DNA and a lower number of ALT flares, when compared with those with cessation of lamivudine. In patients who achieved HBeAg seroconversion with lamivudine, the resistance rate was not high when treatment was continued after HBeAg seroconversion. © 2009 by the American College of Gastroenterology.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2009, v. 104 n. 8, p. 1940-1946 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2009.200
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2009.200
 
dc.identifier.epage1946
 
dc.identifier.hkuros158445
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268965300008
 
dc.identifier.issn0002-9270
2012 Impact Factor: 7.553
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.574
 
dc.identifier.issue8
 
dc.identifier.pmid19455108
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68349128691
 
dc.identifier.spage1940
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163262
 
dc.identifier.volume104
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshChina
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B E Antigens - Blood
 
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B, Chronic - Blood - Drug Therapy - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLamivudine - Administration & Dosage
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Inhibitors - Administration & Dosage
 
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.titleThe duration of lamivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis b: Cessation vs. continuation of treatment after HBeAg seroconversion
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Fung, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lai, CL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tanaka, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Mizokami, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yuen, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, DKH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yuen, MF</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-09-05T05:29:17Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-09-05T05:29:17Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2009</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>American Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2009, v. 104 n. 8, p. 1940-1946</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0002-9270</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/163262</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the virological and biochemical relapse rates in Asian chronic hepatitis B patients with lamivudine-induced hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, between those who stopped therapy after HBeAg seroconversion and those who continued to receive lamivudine.METHODS:All patients with lamivudine-induced HBeAg seroconversion were included. Patients who stopped lamivudine after HBeAg seroconversion (n22) were compared with 79 patients who continued to receive lamivudine (n79). Demographic, virological, and biochemical parameters were recorded at baseline, and throughout the duration of follow-up.RESULTS:In patients who stopped lamivudine, the median follow-up after stopping lamivudine was 20 months. Of these patients, 14 (64%) had virological rebound, with a cumulative incidence of 82% at 4 years. There was no significant difference in number of flares between patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA at the time of stopping lamivudine compared with that in patients with either abnormal ALT, detectable HBV DNA, or both (P0.73). The cumulative incidence of HBeAg seroreversion and ALT flares at 5 years after stopping lamivudine was 9 and 44%, respectively. Of the 79 patients who continued with lamivudine, 62 (78%) had undetectable HBV DNA at the time of last follow-up, whereas no patients had undetectable HBV DNA after stopping lamivudine (P&lt;0.001). The cumulative incidence of ALT flares at 5 years was 16% (P&lt;0.001 compared with those who stopped taking lamivudine). After a median treatment duration of 79 months, lamivudine-resistant mutations occurred in eight patients (10%).CONCLUSIONS:In Asian HBeAg-positive patients, continuing with lamivudine after achieving HBeAg seroconversion was associated with a higher proportion of undetectable HBV DNA and a lower number of ALT flares, when compared with those with cessation of lamivudine. In patients who achieved HBeAg seroconversion with lamivudine, the resistance rate was not high when treatment was continued after HBeAg seroconversion. &#169; 2009 by the American College of Gastroenterology.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Nature Publishing Group. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>American Journal of Gastroenterology</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Adult</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>China</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Hepatitis B E Antigens - Blood</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Hepatitis B, Chronic - Blood - Drug Therapy - Immunology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Lamivudine - Administration &amp; Dosage</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Middle Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors - Administration &amp; Dosage</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Time Factors</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Young Adult</subject.mesh>
<title>The duration of lamivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis b: Cessation vs. continuation of treatment after HBeAg seroconversion</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1038/ajg.2009.200</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>19455108</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-68349128691</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>158445</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68349128691&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>104</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>8</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>1940</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>1946</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000268965300008</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. Nagoya City University
  2. The University of Hong Kong