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Article: Serum zinc-α2-glycoprotein correlates with adiposity, triglycerides, and the key components of the metabolic syndrome in Chinese subjects

TitleSerum zinc-α2-glycoprotein correlates with adiposity, triglycerides, and the key components of the metabolic syndrome in Chinese subjects
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2009, v. 94 n. 7, p. 2531-2536 How to Cite?
AbstractContext: Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a 40-kDa circulating glycoprotein secreted from the liver and adipose tissues. Animal studies have demonstrated the role of ZAG as a lipid-mobilizing factor involved in regulating lipid metabolism and adiposity. However, the clinical relevance of these findings remains to be established. Objective: This study aimed to address the relationship of serum ZAG levels with adiposity and cardiometabolic risk factors in humans. Design and Setting: A total of 258 Chinese subjects [aged 55.1 ± 12.5 yr; 120 males, 138 females; body mass index (BMI), 25.4 ± 4.1 kg/m 2] were randomly selected from the population-based Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study, based on their BMI. Serum ZAG levels were determined with ELISA. The relationship between serum ZAG levels and cardiometabolic parameters was assessed. Results: Serum ZAG levels were higher in men (P < 0.001 vs. women). Serum ZAG correlated positively with age, parameters of adiposity (waist circumference and BMI), fasting insulin, insulin resistance indices, serum triglycerides, adipocyte-fatty acid-binding protein, and C-reactive protein, and diastolic blood pressure (all P < 0.005, age- and sex-adjusted), and inversely with high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P = 0.008, age- and sex-adjusted). It was also elevated progressively with an increasing number of components of the metabolic syndrome (P for trend < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, serum ZAG was independently associated with male sex, the metabolic syndrome (or type 2 diabetes and serum triglycerides), and C-reactive protein (all P ≤ 0.002). Conclusions: ZAG might be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disorders in humans and thus warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2009 by The Endocrine Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163260
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.940
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, DCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:29:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:29:17Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2009, v. 94 n. 7, p. 2531-2536en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-972Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163260-
dc.description.abstractContext: Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a 40-kDa circulating glycoprotein secreted from the liver and adipose tissues. Animal studies have demonstrated the role of ZAG as a lipid-mobilizing factor involved in regulating lipid metabolism and adiposity. However, the clinical relevance of these findings remains to be established. Objective: This study aimed to address the relationship of serum ZAG levels with adiposity and cardiometabolic risk factors in humans. Design and Setting: A total of 258 Chinese subjects [aged 55.1 ± 12.5 yr; 120 males, 138 females; body mass index (BMI), 25.4 ± 4.1 kg/m 2] were randomly selected from the population-based Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study, based on their BMI. Serum ZAG levels were determined with ELISA. The relationship between serum ZAG levels and cardiometabolic parameters was assessed. Results: Serum ZAG levels were higher in men (P < 0.001 vs. women). Serum ZAG correlated positively with age, parameters of adiposity (waist circumference and BMI), fasting insulin, insulin resistance indices, serum triglycerides, adipocyte-fatty acid-binding protein, and C-reactive protein, and diastolic blood pressure (all P < 0.005, age- and sex-adjusted), and inversely with high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P = 0.008, age- and sex-adjusted). It was also elevated progressively with an increasing number of components of the metabolic syndrome (P for trend < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, serum ZAG was independently associated with male sex, the metabolic syndrome (or type 2 diabetes and serum triglycerides), and C-reactive protein (all P ≤ 0.002). Conclusions: ZAG might be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disorders in humans and thus warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2009 by The Endocrine Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Copyright © The Endocrine Society.-
dc.subject.meshAdipokines - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshAdiposity - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - Blood - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCarrier Proteins - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGlycoproteins - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - Blood - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Blood - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTriglycerides - Blooden_US
dc.titleSerum zinc-α2-glycoprotein correlates with adiposity, triglycerides, and the key components of the metabolic syndrome in Chinese subjectsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, Y: yuwanghk@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTso, AWK: awk.tso@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, Y=rp00239en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTso, AWK=rp00535en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.2009-0058en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19351730en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67650224490en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157970-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67650224490&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume94en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2531en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2536en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267767500050-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, DCY=36869426200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Y=34973733700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTso, AWK=6701371436en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, A=7202655409en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7126885-

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