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Article: Traditional Chinese medicine causing hepatotoxicity in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: A 1-year prospective study

TitleTraditional Chinese medicine causing hepatotoxicity in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: A 1-year prospective study
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APT
Citation
Alimentary Pharmacology And Therapeutics, 2006, v. 24 n. 8, p. 1179-1186 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Safety of traditional Chinese medicine in patients with chronic hepatitis B is unknown. Aim: To study the clinical outcome of traditional Chinese medicine-induced hepatotoxicity in chronic hepatitis B patients. Patients and methods: All chronic hepatitis B patients in 2004 with liver dysfunction requiring hospitalization were screened prospectively for traditional Chinese medicine intake. The hepatotoxicity of individual traditional Chinese medicine elements was determined by extensive search of both English and Chinese publications. Results: Of 45 chronic hepatitis B patients, the liver dysfunction in seven (15.6%) was attributable to traditional Chinese medicine. All had liver dysfunction pattern resembling those of acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B. Three patients had adverse outcomes (two deaths, one liver transplantation). One patient had accelerated course of cirrhosis now awaiting liver transplantation. The identified hepatotoxic components were Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, Cassia obtusifolia L, Melia toosendan Sieb., Rheum palmatum L., Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans L, Alisma orientale Juzepe, Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. and Mentha haplocalyx Briq. One traditional Chinese medicine formula was adulterated with a highly hepatotoxic agent, N-nitrosofenfluramine. Conclusions: Traditional Chinese medicine-related hepatotoxicity resulted in high mortality in chronic hepatitis B patients. Prospective randomized-controlled trials with the same stringent criteria as western medicine clinical trials are required for Chinese medicines, to document their efficacies and safety before they can be advocated for the treatment of patients. © 2006 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163024
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.32
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.833
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MFen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, DKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, CLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:26:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:26:42Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationAlimentary Pharmacology And Therapeutics, 2006, v. 24 n. 8, p. 1179-1186en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-2813en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163024-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Safety of traditional Chinese medicine in patients with chronic hepatitis B is unknown. Aim: To study the clinical outcome of traditional Chinese medicine-induced hepatotoxicity in chronic hepatitis B patients. Patients and methods: All chronic hepatitis B patients in 2004 with liver dysfunction requiring hospitalization were screened prospectively for traditional Chinese medicine intake. The hepatotoxicity of individual traditional Chinese medicine elements was determined by extensive search of both English and Chinese publications. Results: Of 45 chronic hepatitis B patients, the liver dysfunction in seven (15.6%) was attributable to traditional Chinese medicine. All had liver dysfunction pattern resembling those of acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B. Three patients had adverse outcomes (two deaths, one liver transplantation). One patient had accelerated course of cirrhosis now awaiting liver transplantation. The identified hepatotoxic components were Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, Cassia obtusifolia L, Melia toosendan Sieb., Rheum palmatum L., Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans L, Alisma orientale Juzepe, Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. and Mentha haplocalyx Briq. One traditional Chinese medicine formula was adulterated with a highly hepatotoxic agent, N-nitrosofenfluramine. Conclusions: Traditional Chinese medicine-related hepatotoxicity resulted in high mortality in chronic hepatitis B patients. Prospective randomized-controlled trials with the same stringent criteria as western medicine clinical trials are required for Chinese medicines, to document their efficacies and safety before they can be advocated for the treatment of patients. © 2006 The Authors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APTen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeuticsen_US
dc.rightsAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshDrugs, Chinese Herbal - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B, Chronic - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Cirrhosis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Diseases - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Transplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicine, Chinese Traditional - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleTraditional Chinese medicine causing hepatotoxicity in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: A 1-year prospective studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, MF:mfyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFung, J:jfung@sicklehut.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DKH:danywong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, BCY:bcywong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, CL:hrmelcl@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, MF=rp00479en_US
dc.identifier.authorityFung, J=rp00518en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DKH=rp00492en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, BCY=rp00429en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, CL=rp00314en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2036.2006.03111.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17014576-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748899824en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros130677-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748899824&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage1179en_US
dc.identifier.epage1186en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240660500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, MF=7102031955en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, S=7202037323en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, J=23091109300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DKH=7401535819en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, BCY=7402023340en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, CL=7403086396en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike862040-

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