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Article: Comparison of atorvastatin and simvastatin in the long-term treatment of hyperlipidemia after kidney transplantation

TitleComparison of atorvastatin and simvastatin in the long-term treatment of hyperlipidemia after kidney transplantation
Authors
KeywordsAtorvastatin
Hypercholesterolemia
Kidney transplantation
Simvastatin
Issue Date2006
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjn.org/
Citation
Hong Kong Journal Of Nephrology, 2006, v. 8 n. 1, p. 17-23 How to Cite?
Abstract
Background: Hyperlipidemia is a common complication after kidney transplantation. However, there is little long-term data on the efficacy and tolerability of statin therapy in kidney transplant recipients. Methods: We performed a prospective 3-year study to investigate the effects of atorvastatin treatment in 15 hypercholesterolemic stable renal allograft recipients on maintenance immunosuppression with corticosteroid and cyclosporine. Results were compared with data from 15 historical controls matched for baseline hyperlipidemia and renal allograft function who had been treated with simvastatin. Results: Patients in the two treatment groups showed similar baseline characteristics. The average dosages of atorvastatin and simvastatin were 9.25 ± 2.82 mg and 8.38 ± 1.86 mg, respectively. Atorvastatin treatment reduced total cholesterol (TC) by 31.1%, 27.7%, 25.9% and 28.9%, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by 43.4%, 37.4%, 36.8% and 41.6%, after 3, 12, 24 and 36 months of treatment, respectively. A significant reduction in triglycerides (TG) was noted after 3 and 9 months, but was not sustained. High-density lipoprotein levels were unaltered. Reductions in TC and LDL after simvastatin treatment appeared less pronounced, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. At last follow-up, 90.9% of atorvastatin-treated patients achieved target LDL of less than 3.4 mmol/L, compared with 78.6% of the simvastatin group. No patients developed adverse reactions including abnormalities in liver enzyme or creatine kinase levels. Acute rejection was not observed, although one patient on simvastatin developed chronic allograft nephropathy. Conclusion: Atorvastatin and simvastatin demonstrated sustained efficacy in reducing the levels of TC and LDL in stable renal allograft recipients. While atorvastatin may be more potent than simvastatin in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, its TG-lowering effect was not sustained with long-term treatment. The difference in the therapeutic efficacy between the two drugs might have been due to dose rather than to the drugs themselves.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162971
ISSN
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.110
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYao, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, MFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, FKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, KNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:26:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:26:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal Of Nephrology, 2006, v. 8 n. 1, p. 17-23en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1561-5413en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162971-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Hyperlipidemia is a common complication after kidney transplantation. However, there is little long-term data on the efficacy and tolerability of statin therapy in kidney transplant recipients. Methods: We performed a prospective 3-year study to investigate the effects of atorvastatin treatment in 15 hypercholesterolemic stable renal allograft recipients on maintenance immunosuppression with corticosteroid and cyclosporine. Results were compared with data from 15 historical controls matched for baseline hyperlipidemia and renal allograft function who had been treated with simvastatin. Results: Patients in the two treatment groups showed similar baseline characteristics. The average dosages of atorvastatin and simvastatin were 9.25 ± 2.82 mg and 8.38 ± 1.86 mg, respectively. Atorvastatin treatment reduced total cholesterol (TC) by 31.1%, 27.7%, 25.9% and 28.9%, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by 43.4%, 37.4%, 36.8% and 41.6%, after 3, 12, 24 and 36 months of treatment, respectively. A significant reduction in triglycerides (TG) was noted after 3 and 9 months, but was not sustained. High-density lipoprotein levels were unaltered. Reductions in TC and LDL after simvastatin treatment appeared less pronounced, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. At last follow-up, 90.9% of atorvastatin-treated patients achieved target LDL of less than 3.4 mmol/L, compared with 78.6% of the simvastatin group. No patients developed adverse reactions including abnormalities in liver enzyme or creatine kinase levels. Acute rejection was not observed, although one patient on simvastatin developed chronic allograft nephropathy. Conclusion: Atorvastatin and simvastatin demonstrated sustained efficacy in reducing the levels of TC and LDL in stable renal allograft recipients. While atorvastatin may be more potent than simvastatin in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, its TG-lowering effect was not sustained with long-term treatment. The difference in the therapeutic efficacy between the two drugs might have been due to dose rather than to the drugs themselves.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjn.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Nephrologyen_HK
dc.subjectAtorvastatinen_HK
dc.subjectHypercholesterolemiaen_HK
dc.subjectKidney transplantationen_HK
dc.subjectSimvastatinen_HK
dc.titleComparison of atorvastatin and simvastatin in the long-term treatment of hyperlipidemia after kidney transplantationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, KN: knlai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM: dtmchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, KN=rp00324en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1561-5413(09)60225-8-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646239177en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros132004-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646239177&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume8en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage17en_HK
dc.identifier.epage23en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, KC=7102609864en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYao, Q=55046734600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PS=14219904600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MF=35300050600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, FK=8219093900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, KN=7402135706en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_HK

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