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Article: Histological reclassification of lupus nephritis

TitleHistological reclassification of lupus nephritis
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-nephrolhypertens.com/
Citation
Current Opinion In Nephrology And Hypertension, 2005, v. 14 n. 6, p. 561-566 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose of review: This review examines the progress in clinico-pathologic studies following the publication of the International Society of Nephrology (ISN)/Renal Pathology Society (RPS) 2003 classification of lupus nephritis. Major features in this classification system include non-ambiguous diagnostic criteria based on quantitative assessment of histological abnormalities and further classification of Class IV lesions with regard to the predominance of segmental or global lesions. Recent findings: The new classification has been applied in two recent retrospective studies. Key findings included improved diagnostic concordance compared with the World Hearth Organization classification for lupus nephritis, but no observable difference in renal outcome between Classes IV-S and IV-G during short-term follow up. The data also suggested that fibrinoid necrosis and interstitial inflammation may be more prominent in the IV-S group. While the new classification stipulates the description of individual lesions indicating activity or chronicity, it has not devised new composite histological scores. In this regard, recent studies on novel histological indices of lupus renal biopsies based on digital imaging and computerized data analysis have demonstrated a better correlation with clinical parameters. Summary: The ISN/RPS 2003 classification facilitates accurate communication between pathologists and clinicians. It also provides a clear framework for standardization, upon which the clinical and pathogenetic significance of individual lesions and histological subtypes require further elucidation. © 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162894
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.232
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.632
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:24:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:24:53Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Opinion In Nephrology And Hypertension, 2005, v. 14 n. 6, p. 561-566en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-4821en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162894-
dc.description.abstractPurpose of review: This review examines the progress in clinico-pathologic studies following the publication of the International Society of Nephrology (ISN)/Renal Pathology Society (RPS) 2003 classification of lupus nephritis. Major features in this classification system include non-ambiguous diagnostic criteria based on quantitative assessment of histological abnormalities and further classification of Class IV lesions with regard to the predominance of segmental or global lesions. Recent findings: The new classification has been applied in two recent retrospective studies. Key findings included improved diagnostic concordance compared with the World Hearth Organization classification for lupus nephritis, but no observable difference in renal outcome between Classes IV-S and IV-G during short-term follow up. The data also suggested that fibrinoid necrosis and interstitial inflammation may be more prominent in the IV-S group. While the new classification stipulates the description of individual lesions indicating activity or chronicity, it has not devised new composite histological scores. In this regard, recent studies on novel histological indices of lupus renal biopsies based on digital imaging and computerized data analysis have demonstrated a better correlation with clinical parameters. Summary: The ISN/RPS 2003 classification facilitates accurate communication between pathologists and clinicians. It also provides a clear framework for standardization, upon which the clinical and pathogenetic significance of individual lesions and histological subtypes require further elucidation. © 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-nephrolhypertens.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertensionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKidney - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLupus Nephritis - Classification - Pathologyen_US
dc.titleHistological reclassification of lupus nephritisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM:dtmchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.mnh.0000168934.18399.97-
dc.identifier.pmid16205476-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27444445070en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros117893-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27444445070&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage561en_US
dc.identifier.epage566en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233180000008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_US

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