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Article: Clinical relevance of hydrocephalus as a presenting feature of tuberculous meningitis

TitleClinical relevance of hydrocephalus as a presenting feature of tuberculous meningitis
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
QJM - Monthly Journal Of The Association Of Physicians, 2003, v. 96 n. 9, p. 643-648 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Hydrocephalus is a common complication of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Aim: To study the incidence, associated clinical features, and impact on outcome of hydrocephalus at presentation in TBM. Design: Observational study. Setting: Regional hospital serving 500 000 people. Methods: Adult patients with TBM were studied over 57 months. Those with hydrocephalus on initial CT scan were assessed by neurosurgeons. Clinical, neuroradiological, and biochemical features of patients with hydrocephalus upon presentation were compared to those without initial hydrocephalus. Results: Of 31 TBM patients during the study period, nine (29.0%) had hydrocephalus at presentation, and eight of them (25.8% of all) underwent urgent neurosurgical intervention. Of the 22 patients without initial hydrocephalus, hydrocephalus developed after commencement of chemotherapy in one patient only. Hydrocephalus at presentation was associated with a longer duration of presenting symptoms (p = 0.01), ataxia (p = 0.001), later stages of TBM (p = 0.045), a longer delay before commencement of anti-tuberculous chemotherapy (p = 0.001), stroke (p = 0.012), and a poor outcome at 1 year (p = 0.001). Discussion: Hydrocephalus upon presentation is common in our TBM patients. This may be a poor prognostic marker associated with severe TBM and a higher risk of stroke.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162710
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.824
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.633
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTFen_US
dc.contributor.authorFong, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, SLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:22:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:22:36Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationQJM - Monthly Journal Of The Association Of Physicians, 2003, v. 96 n. 9, p. 643-648en_US
dc.identifier.issn1460-2725en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162710-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Hydrocephalus is a common complication of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Aim: To study the incidence, associated clinical features, and impact on outcome of hydrocephalus at presentation in TBM. Design: Observational study. Setting: Regional hospital serving 500 000 people. Methods: Adult patients with TBM were studied over 57 months. Those with hydrocephalus on initial CT scan were assessed by neurosurgeons. Clinical, neuroradiological, and biochemical features of patients with hydrocephalus upon presentation were compared to those without initial hydrocephalus. Results: Of 31 TBM patients during the study period, nine (29.0%) had hydrocephalus at presentation, and eight of them (25.8% of all) underwent urgent neurosurgical intervention. Of the 22 patients without initial hydrocephalus, hydrocephalus developed after commencement of chemotherapy in one patient only. Hydrocephalus at presentation was associated with a longer duration of presenting symptoms (p = 0.01), ataxia (p = 0.001), later stages of TBM (p = 0.045), a longer delay before commencement of anti-tuberculous chemotherapy (p = 0.001), stroke (p = 0.012), and a poor outcome at 1 year (p = 0.001). Discussion: Hydrocephalus upon presentation is common in our TBM patients. This may be a poor prognostic marker associated with severe TBM and a higher risk of stroke.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofQJM - Monthly Journal of the Association of Physiciansen_US
dc.rightsQJM. Copyright © Oxford University Press.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshAntitubercular Agents - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrocephalus - Cerebrospinal Fluid - Drug Therapy - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium Tuberculosis - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshNervous System Diseases - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshStroke - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis, Meningeal - Cerebrospinal Fluid - Complications - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.titleClinical relevance of hydrocephalus as a presenting feature of tuberculous meningitisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF:rtcheung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/qjmed/hcg108en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12925719-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042377405en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros80674-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0042377405&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume96en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage643en_US
dc.identifier.epage648en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000184923400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034963en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, RTF=7202397498en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, CY=35993612600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, KL=7201554745en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, W=22948344000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SL=8224398100en_US

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