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Article: Sequential intravenous/oral antibiotic vs. continuous intravenous antibiotic in the treatment of pyogenic liver abscess
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TitleSequential intravenous/oral antibiotic vs. continuous intravenous antibiotic in the treatment of pyogenic liver abscess
 
AuthorsNg, FH2
Wong, WM1
Wong, BCY
Kng, C2
Wong, SY2
Lai, KC
Cheng, CS2
Yuen, WC2
Lam, SK
Lai, CL
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APT
 
CitationAlimentary Pharmacology And Therapeutics, 2002, v. 16 n. 6, p. 1083-1090 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2002.01266.x
 
AbstractAim: Pyogenic liver abscesses result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Antimicrobial regimens using sequential intravenous/oral therapy may reduce the length of hospital stay. In this retrospective analysis, the efficacy of continuous intravenous antibiotic therapy (group I) vs. sequential intravenous/oral antibiotic therapy (group II) was studied in patients with pyogenic liver abscess. Methods: One hundred and twelve consecutive patients (55 in group I and 57 in group II) with pyogenic liver abscess were analysed. Clinical response, length of hospital stay and relapse rates were examined. Results: Group II had a significantly shorter duration of intravenous antibiotic treatment (3.2 weeks vs. 5.9 weeks, P < 0.01) and a shorter length of hospital stay (28 days vs, 42 days, P < 0.01) when compared to group I. Oral antibiotics were prescribed for a median duration of 2.9 weeks in group II after discharge. No relapse occurred within 6 weeks after the completion of treatment in both groups. The cost of therapy was significantly lower in group II than in group I by 33%. Conclusions: A sequential intravenous/oral antibiotic regime is a safe and effective treatment for pyogenic liver abscess. This reduces the cost of therapy and the length of hospital stay.
 
ISSN0269-2813
2013 Impact Factor: 5.478
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.609
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2002.01266.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000175838300006
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNg, FH
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCY
 
dc.contributor.authorKng, C
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, CS
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, CL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:21:16Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:21:16Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractAim: Pyogenic liver abscesses result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Antimicrobial regimens using sequential intravenous/oral therapy may reduce the length of hospital stay. In this retrospective analysis, the efficacy of continuous intravenous antibiotic therapy (group I) vs. sequential intravenous/oral antibiotic therapy (group II) was studied in patients with pyogenic liver abscess. Methods: One hundred and twelve consecutive patients (55 in group I and 57 in group II) with pyogenic liver abscess were analysed. Clinical response, length of hospital stay and relapse rates were examined. Results: Group II had a significantly shorter duration of intravenous antibiotic treatment (3.2 weeks vs. 5.9 weeks, P < 0.01) and a shorter length of hospital stay (28 days vs, 42 days, P < 0.01) when compared to group I. Oral antibiotics were prescribed for a median duration of 2.9 weeks in group II after discharge. No relapse occurred within 6 weeks after the completion of treatment in both groups. The cost of therapy was significantly lower in group II than in group I by 33%. Conclusions: A sequential intravenous/oral antibiotic regime is a safe and effective treatment for pyogenic liver abscess. This reduces the cost of therapy and the length of hospital stay.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAlimentary Pharmacology And Therapeutics, 2002, v. 16 n. 6, p. 1083-1090 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2002.01266.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2002.01266.x
 
dc.identifier.epage1090
 
dc.identifier.hkuros66971
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000175838300006
 
dc.identifier.issn0269-2813
2013 Impact Factor: 5.478
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.609
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035999139
 
dc.identifier.spage1083
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162566
 
dc.identifier.volume16
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APT
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
dc.titleSequential intravenous/oral antibiotic vs. continuous intravenous antibiotic in the treatment of pyogenic liver abscess
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<item><contributor.author>Ng, FH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, WM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, BCY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kng, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, SY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lai, KC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheng, CS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yuen, WC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, SK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lai, CL</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-09-05T05:21:16Z</date.accessioned>
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<description.abstract>Aim: Pyogenic liver abscesses result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Antimicrobial regimens using sequential intravenous/oral therapy may reduce the length of hospital stay. In this retrospective analysis, the efficacy of continuous intravenous antibiotic therapy (group I) vs. sequential intravenous/oral antibiotic therapy (group II) was studied in patients with pyogenic liver abscess. Methods: One hundred and twelve consecutive patients (55 in group I and 57 in group II) with pyogenic liver abscess were analysed. Clinical response, length of hospital stay and relapse rates were examined. Results: Group II had a significantly shorter duration of intravenous antibiotic treatment (3.2 weeks vs. 5.9 weeks, P &lt; 0.01) and a shorter length of hospital stay (28 days vs, 42 days, P &lt; 0.01) when compared to group I. Oral antibiotics were prescribed for a median duration of 2.9 weeks in group II after discharge. No relapse occurred within 6 weeks after the completion of treatment in both groups. The cost of therapy was significantly lower in group II than in group I by 33%. Conclusions: A sequential intravenous/oral antibiotic regime is a safe and effective treatment for pyogenic liver abscess. This reduces the cost of therapy and the length of hospital stay.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Ruttonjee Hospital Hong Kong