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Article: Pathogenic role of hepatitis B virus in hepatitis B surface antigen- negative decompensated cirrhosis

TitlePathogenic role of hepatitis B virus in hepatitis B surface antigen- negative decompensated cirrhosis
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hepatology.org/
Citation
Hepatology, 1995, v. 22 n. 1, p. 25-29 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study was conducted to determine the rate of detection of serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative decompensated cirrhotic patients who had hepatitis B core and/or surface antibodies (anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs), and to compare the outcome of HBsAg- positive cirrhotic patients who did or did not clear HBsAg during follow-up. Six (5%) of 121 HBsAg-positive cirrhotic patients lost HBsAg after 0.2 to 17.1 years (mean, 9.1 ± 8.2 yr) of follow-up. The cumulative rates of loss of HBsAg at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years were, respectively, 1.3%, 1.3%, 7.4%, and 44.5%. Compared with the patients who remained HBsAg-positive, those who lost HBsAg had milder disease at presentation and significantly longer survival. Of the patients who lost HBsAg, 83% had improvement in liver function after the loss of HBsAg, and all were alive at the time of writing (0.8 to 5.7 years after loss of HBsAg), whereas 27% of those who remained HBsAg-positive had died and 29% had deterioration in liver function. The rate of detection of serum HBV DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was higher in HBsAg-positive cirrhotic patients who lost HBsAg: 67% versus cirrhotic patients who had no previous history of chronic HBV infection; 16% (cryptogenic) and 29% (hepatitis C virus and/or alcohol-induced liver disease). In summary, we found that using PCR, serum HBV DNA can be detected in 28% of HBsAg-negative cirrhotic patients who were studied, but the pathogenic significance of such small amounts of virus is not clear. Liver function can improve and survival can be prolonged in HBsAg positive decompensated cirrhotic patients who subsequently lost HBsAg.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162106
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.711
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.752
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, HTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLok, ASFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:17:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:17:22Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationHepatology, 1995, v. 22 n. 1, p. 25-29en_US
dc.identifier.issn0270-9139en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162106-
dc.description.abstractThis study was conducted to determine the rate of detection of serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative decompensated cirrhotic patients who had hepatitis B core and/or surface antibodies (anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs), and to compare the outcome of HBsAg- positive cirrhotic patients who did or did not clear HBsAg during follow-up. Six (5%) of 121 HBsAg-positive cirrhotic patients lost HBsAg after 0.2 to 17.1 years (mean, 9.1 ± 8.2 yr) of follow-up. The cumulative rates of loss of HBsAg at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years were, respectively, 1.3%, 1.3%, 7.4%, and 44.5%. Compared with the patients who remained HBsAg-positive, those who lost HBsAg had milder disease at presentation and significantly longer survival. Of the patients who lost HBsAg, 83% had improvement in liver function after the loss of HBsAg, and all were alive at the time of writing (0.8 to 5.7 years after loss of HBsAg), whereas 27% of those who remained HBsAg-positive had died and 29% had deterioration in liver function. The rate of detection of serum HBV DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was higher in HBsAg-positive cirrhotic patients who lost HBsAg: 67% versus cirrhotic patients who had no previous history of chronic HBV infection; 16% (cryptogenic) and 29% (hepatitis C virus and/or alcohol-induced liver disease). In summary, we found that using PCR, serum HBV DNA can be detected in 28% of HBsAg-negative cirrhotic patients who were studied, but the pathogenic significance of such small amounts of virus is not clear. Liver function can improve and survival can be prolonged in HBsAg positive decompensated cirrhotic patients who subsequently lost HBsAg.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hepatology.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHepatologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Viral - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B Surface Antigens - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B Virus - Genetics - Pathogenicityen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Cirrhosis - Mortality - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysisen_US
dc.titlePathogenic role of hepatitis B virus in hepatitis B surface antigen- negative decompensated cirrhosisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, CL:hrmelcl@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, CL=rp00314en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0270-9139(95)90348-8-
dc.identifier.pmid7601418-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029144473en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage25en_US
dc.identifier.epage29en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RJ63800004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, HT=36797189000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, CL=7403086396en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLok, ASF=35379868500en_US

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