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Article: A prospective study of hepatitis C virus infection among renal transplant recipients

TitleA prospective study of hepatitis C virus infection among renal transplant recipients
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 1993, v. 104 n. 3, p. 862-868 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis is a major cause of liver disease in renal transplant recipients. Methods: One hundred eighty-five renal allograft recipients, including 151 who had been prospectively followed up for 24 months, were studied to determine the prevalence and course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Antibody to HCV (anti-HCV) was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and HCV RNA was measured by nested polymerase chain reaction assay. Results: Twenty-three (12.4%) patients were positive for anti-HCV and/or HCV RNA: 19 (10.3%) were anti-HCV positive; and HCV RNA was detected in 18 (94.7%) anti-HCV-positive and 4 (2.4%) anti-HCV-negative patients. Markers of HCV infection persisted in all HCV-positive patients over the 2-year period. Most HCV-positive patients acquired HCV infection before or at the time of transplantation. The incidence of new infection after transplantation was 0.45% per patient-year. Anti-HCV and/or HCV RNA was detected in 75% of patients with biochemical chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis, but transaminase levels were persistently normal in 30.4% of HCV-positive individuals. Conclusions: HCV infection is common among renal transplant recipients. Testing for HCV RNA is important because some patients might not produce anti-HCV. Transaminase levels cannot be used as a surrogate marker of HCV infection in these patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162012
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLok, ASFen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, IKPen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, RTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:16:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:16:40Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 1993, v. 104 n. 3, p. 862-868en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162012-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis is a major cause of liver disease in renal transplant recipients. Methods: One hundred eighty-five renal allograft recipients, including 151 who had been prospectively followed up for 24 months, were studied to determine the prevalence and course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Antibody to HCV (anti-HCV) was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and HCV RNA was measured by nested polymerase chain reaction assay. Results: Twenty-three (12.4%) patients were positive for anti-HCV and/or HCV RNA: 19 (10.3%) were anti-HCV positive; and HCV RNA was detected in 18 (94.7%) anti-HCV-positive and 4 (2.4%) anti-HCV-negative patients. Markers of HCV infection persisted in all HCV-positive patients over the 2-year period. Most HCV-positive patients acquired HCV infection before or at the time of transplantation. The incidence of new infection after transplantation was 0.45% per patient-year. Anti-HCV and/or HCV RNA was detected in 75% of patients with biochemical chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis, but transaminase levels were persistently normal in 30.4% of HCV-positive individuals. Conclusions: HCV infection is common among renal transplant recipients. Testing for HCV RNA is important because some patients might not produce anti-HCV. Transaminase levels cannot be used as a surrogate marker of HCV infection in these patients.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAlanine Transaminase - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHepacivirus - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis Antibodies - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B Surface Antigens - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C Antibodiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKidney Transplantation - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshRenal Dialysis - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleA prospective study of hepatitis C virus infection among renal transplant recipientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM:dtmchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7680019-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027534509en_US
dc.identifier.volume104en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage862en_US
dc.identifier.epage868en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993KP44800023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLok, ASF=35379868500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, IKP=7102537483en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, RT=7403110774en_US

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