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Article: Hepatocarcinogenesis.

TitleHepatocarcinogenesis.
Authors
Issue Date1990
Citation
Tropical Gastroenterology : Official Journal Of The Digestive Diseases Foundation, 1990, v. 11 n. 1, p. 9-24 How to Cite?
AbstractHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most frequent malignant tumour of the liver, is the commonest cancer occurring in males in the world. The annual incidence of the disease worldwide is estimated to be one million cases. There are variations in its geographical distribution. It tops the list of malignancies amongst males in sub-saharan Africa; it is the second most common cancer in Southeast Asia, including Hong Kong, and ranks third amongst males in China. It is relatively rare in America, Europe North Africa, and the Middle East. During the last 15 years, epidemiologic and laboratory investigations have established a strong and specific association between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and HCC. Hepatic cirrhosis is another major aetiologic factor incriminated. In areas with a low incidence of HCC, cirrhosis due to alcohol may be a relatively more important predisposing factor. Chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis (NANBH) infection has now been incriminated as a cause of HCC, especially in Japan. Other environmental factors, particularly chemical carcinogens such as Aflatoxin, smoking, genetic predisposition and sex hormones may also act to promote hepatocarcinogenesis. The exact mechanisms of neoplastic transformation, however, are still far from understood. The following factors are discussed in detail: 1. HBV infection 2. Cirrhosis 3. NANBH infection 4. Aflatoxin B1 5. Cigarette smoking 6. Alcohol A number of less important associated diseases are also listed in Table I. At the end of this paper, a tentative scheme for hepatocarcinogenesis has been proposed and the methods for prevention is discussed in light of the risk factors considered.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161822
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.188

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, JYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, CLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:15:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:15:17Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationTropical Gastroenterology : Official Journal Of The Digestive Diseases Foundation, 1990, v. 11 n. 1, p. 9-24en_US
dc.identifier.issn0250-636Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161822-
dc.description.abstractHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most frequent malignant tumour of the liver, is the commonest cancer occurring in males in the world. The annual incidence of the disease worldwide is estimated to be one million cases. There are variations in its geographical distribution. It tops the list of malignancies amongst males in sub-saharan Africa; it is the second most common cancer in Southeast Asia, including Hong Kong, and ranks third amongst males in China. It is relatively rare in America, Europe North Africa, and the Middle East. During the last 15 years, epidemiologic and laboratory investigations have established a strong and specific association between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and HCC. Hepatic cirrhosis is another major aetiologic factor incriminated. In areas with a low incidence of HCC, cirrhosis due to alcohol may be a relatively more important predisposing factor. Chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis (NANBH) infection has now been incriminated as a cause of HCC, especially in Japan. Other environmental factors, particularly chemical carcinogens such as Aflatoxin, smoking, genetic predisposition and sex hormones may also act to promote hepatocarcinogenesis. The exact mechanisms of neoplastic transformation, however, are still far from understood. The following factors are discussed in detail: 1. HBV infection 2. Cirrhosis 3. NANBH infection 4. Aflatoxin B1 5. Cigarette smoking 6. Alcohol A number of less important associated diseases are also listed in Table I. At the end of this paper, a tentative scheme for hepatocarcinogenesis has been proposed and the methods for prevention is discussed in light of the risk factors considered.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTropical gastroenterology : official journal of the Digestive Diseases Foundationen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Hepatocellular - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Cirrhosis - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Neoplasms - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Neoplasms, Experimentalen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleHepatocarcinogenesis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, CL:hrmelcl@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, CL=rp00314en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2162576-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025068034en_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage9en_US
dc.identifier.epage24en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, JY=7402446047en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, CL=7403086396en_US

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