File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Primary hyperparathyroidism: Its clinical pattern and results of surgical treatment in Hong Kong Chinese

TitlePrimary hyperparathyroidism: Its clinical pattern and results of surgical treatment in Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
Issue Date1988
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surg
Citation
Surgery, 1988, v. 103 n. 5, p. 558-562 How to Cite?
AbstractPrimary hyperparathyroidism has been increasingly diagnosed among whites since the advent of the biochemical autoanalyzer. However, the condition remains uncommon among Orientals. Our experience with 31 patients at the Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, in the periods before and after we began to use the biochemical autoanalyzer was reviewed. The prevalence of primary hyperparathyroidism rose slightly from 3.1 to 3.7 per 100,000 hospital population. In both periods skeletal manifestation was the major clinical presentation, followed by hypercalcemic symptoms and urologic disease. Asymptomatic hypercalcemia occurred in three of 31 patients despite the use of biochemical autoanalyzer. Preoperative localization was carried out in 27 patients and was helpful in nine (33.3%) of them. The surgeon explored all four parathyroids, removed the diseased gland(s), and examined a biopsy specimen of one normal-appearing gland. There were 27 adenomas, two carcinomas, one four-gland hyperplasia, and one sarcoidosis. Twenty-eight patients had transient hypocalcemia after parathyroidectomy and required calcium supplements for variable periods. Before and after we began to use the biochemical autoanalyzer, there was a minimal change in the prevalence and clinical pattern of primary hyperparathyroidism seen in our hospital. In our experience, successful parathyroidectomy depends more on the surgeon's operative technique than on preoperative localization.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161764
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.620
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, PSYen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoey, JHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, CCLen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, JTCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, RTTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:14:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:14:45Z-
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.citationSurgery, 1988, v. 103 n. 5, p. 558-562en_US
dc.identifier.issn0039-6060en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161764-
dc.description.abstractPrimary hyperparathyroidism has been increasingly diagnosed among whites since the advent of the biochemical autoanalyzer. However, the condition remains uncommon among Orientals. Our experience with 31 patients at the Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, in the periods before and after we began to use the biochemical autoanalyzer was reviewed. The prevalence of primary hyperparathyroidism rose slightly from 3.1 to 3.7 per 100,000 hospital population. In both periods skeletal manifestation was the major clinical presentation, followed by hypercalcemic symptoms and urologic disease. Asymptomatic hypercalcemia occurred in three of 31 patients despite the use of biochemical autoanalyzer. Preoperative localization was carried out in 27 patients and was helpful in nine (33.3%) of them. The surgeon explored all four parathyroids, removed the diseased gland(s), and examined a biopsy specimen of one normal-appearing gland. There were 27 adenomas, two carcinomas, one four-gland hyperplasia, and one sarcoidosis. Twenty-eight patients had transient hypocalcemia after parathyroidectomy and required calcium supplements for variable periods. Before and after we began to use the biochemical autoanalyzer, there was a minimal change in the prevalence and clinical pattern of primary hyperparathyroidism seen in our hospital. In our experience, successful parathyroidectomy depends more on the surgeon's operative technique than on preoperative localization.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSurgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdenoma - Complications - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAutoanalysis - Instrumentationen_US
dc.subject.meshCalcium - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHyperparathyroidism - Blood - Complications - Epidemiology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshHypocalcemia - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshParathyroid Glands - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshParathyroid Neoplasms - Complications - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications - Etiologyen_US
dc.titlePrimary hyperparathyroidism: Its clinical pattern and results of surgical treatment in Hong Kong Chineseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid3363491-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0023923442en_US
dc.identifier.volume103en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage558en_US
dc.identifier.epage562en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1988N359500010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, PSY=7202595368en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoey, JH=7003838670en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, CCL=7501631357en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, JTC=24491943700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, RTT=7102833337en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats