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Article: Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

TitleEarly effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function
Authors
Issue Date1987
PublisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 1987, v. 64 n. 3, p. 418-424 How to Cite?
AbstractHypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 ± 78 (±SD) and 6167 ± 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, FSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161721
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.940
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, VKCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:14:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:14:20Z-
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 1987, v. 64 n. 3, p. 418-424en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-972Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161721-
dc.description.abstractHypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 ± 78 (±SD) and 6167 ± 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, FSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma - Radiotherapyen_US
dc.subject.meshEstradiol - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrocortisone - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshHyperprolactinemia - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHypopituitarism - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHypothalamo-Hypophyseal System - Radiation Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - Radiotherapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPituitary Hormones, Anterior - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshPituitary Irradiation - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshThyroxine - Blooden_US
dc.titleEarly effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary functionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jcem-64-3-418-
dc.identifier.pmid3818886-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0023157618en_US
dc.identifier.volume64en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage418en_US
dc.identifier.epage424en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1987G176400003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, VKC=7003530649en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, C=7501631357en_US

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