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Conference Paper: Doctoral students' development in information literacy

TitleDoctoral students' development in information literacy
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong
Citation
The 2011 Research Symposium of the Center for Information Technology in Education (CITERS 2011), The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 30 June 2011. How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper aims to investigate how doctoral level students developed their information literacy in the beginning years of their doctoral research by focusing on the sources, databases and search engines they found relevant, the difficulties they encountered when engaging in information search with different databases, and the affordances offered by the databases which they found useful. This study adopts a one-year longitudinal approach which involved students‟ interactions with a search expert who showed them how to conduct searches more effectively. A combination of quantitative and qualitative data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, think-aloud protocol, and direct observation were used. The goal is to identify students‟ initial searching abilities and their performance after receiving guidance from an expert. Vygotsky’s social learning theory is used as the theoretical lens. Social learning theory argues that interactions with the more capable ones in the environment stimulate developmental processes and foster cognitive growth. For example, teachers and learners can work together on a difficult task with the teachers providing scaffolding to students. As such, students can complete tasks that they could not have completed on their own. The relationship between the teacher and the learner is essential in student learning as acquiring knowledge and skills from an experienced other is an important method for developing competence in a task. Social learning theory could also be applied into the information seeking situation where a master-apprentice relationship could be a possible solution to improve doctoral students‟ information literacy skills, where scaffolding support by information search experts could probably help them to improve their search techniques.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161203

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTing, KKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, SKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, MMLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, GYCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T07:09:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T07:09:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2011 Research Symposium of the Center for Information Technology in Education (CITERS 2011), The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 30 June 2011.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161203-
dc.description.abstractThis paper aims to investigate how doctoral level students developed their information literacy in the beginning years of their doctoral research by focusing on the sources, databases and search engines they found relevant, the difficulties they encountered when engaging in information search with different databases, and the affordances offered by the databases which they found useful. This study adopts a one-year longitudinal approach which involved students‟ interactions with a search expert who showed them how to conduct searches more effectively. A combination of quantitative and qualitative data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, think-aloud protocol, and direct observation were used. The goal is to identify students‟ initial searching abilities and their performance after receiving guidance from an expert. Vygotsky’s social learning theory is used as the theoretical lens. Social learning theory argues that interactions with the more capable ones in the environment stimulate developmental processes and foster cognitive growth. For example, teachers and learners can work together on a difficult task with the teachers providing scaffolding to students. As such, students can complete tasks that they could not have completed on their own. The relationship between the teacher and the learner is essential in student learning as acquiring knowledge and skills from an experienced other is an important method for developing competence in a task. Social learning theory could also be applied into the information seeking situation where a master-apprentice relationship could be a possible solution to improve doctoral students‟ information literacy skills, where scaffolding support by information search experts could probably help them to improve their search techniques.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong-
dc.relation.ispartofCITE Research Symposium, CITERS 2011en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDoctoral students' development in information literacyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, SKW: samchu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChu, SKW=rp00897en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros203809en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130913-

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