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Conference Paper: Developing multiple literacies for BSc Information Management students

TitleDeveloping multiple literacies for BSc Information Management students
Authors
KeywordsMultiple literacies
Information literacy
Web 2.0
Computer software
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong
Citation
The 2011 Research Symposium of the Center for Information Technology in Education (CITERS 2011), The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 30 June 2011. How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examines the development of information, computer software, and Web 2.0 literacies among undergraduate students at the University of Hong Kong. A survey was administered to students undertaking the Bachelor of Science in Information Management three times: on entry, in the middle, and towards the completion of the program. It assessed their self-reported literacy levels and their perceptions of familiarity with and the importance of the three literacies. Preliminary findings indicated that students had improved in all three forms of literacy at the end of the two academic years. Moreover, positive associations were found between their familiarity with each literacy, and their perceptions of its importance. Mastering multiple literacies fosters life-long learning by enabling students to search for information effectively and use applications such as Web 2.0 tools and computer software to present their ideas in academic activities and ultimately in the workplace. Accordingly, the study has implications for educators and librarians working to develop multiple literacies among Hong Kong university students.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161200

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, SKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorFong, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, PTYen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T07:09:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T07:09:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2011 Research Symposium of the Center for Information Technology in Education (CITERS 2011), The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 30 June 2011.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161200-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the development of information, computer software, and Web 2.0 literacies among undergraduate students at the University of Hong Kong. A survey was administered to students undertaking the Bachelor of Science in Information Management three times: on entry, in the middle, and towards the completion of the program. It assessed their self-reported literacy levels and their perceptions of familiarity with and the importance of the three literacies. Preliminary findings indicated that students had improved in all three forms of literacy at the end of the two academic years. Moreover, positive associations were found between their familiarity with each literacy, and their perceptions of its importance. Mastering multiple literacies fosters life-long learning by enabling students to search for information effectively and use applications such as Web 2.0 tools and computer software to present their ideas in academic activities and ultimately in the workplace. Accordingly, the study has implications for educators and librarians working to develop multiple literacies among Hong Kong university students.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong-
dc.relation.ispartofCITE Research Symposium, CITERS 2011en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectMultiple literacies-
dc.subjectInformation literacy-
dc.subjectWeb 2.0-
dc.subjectComputer software-
dc.titleDeveloping multiple literacies for BSc Information Management studentsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, SKW: samchu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChu, SKW=rp00897en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros203804en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130913-

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