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Article: Exploring the interplay of gender, discourse, and (im)politeness

TitleExploring the interplay of gender, discourse, and (im)politeness
Authors
KeywordsDiscourse analysis
Gender identity
Language
Media
Politeness
Issue Date2012
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09589236.asp
Citation
Journal of Gender Studies, 2012, v. 21 n. 3, p. 285-300 How to Cite?
AbstractDrawing upon the method of discourse analysis, this article explores the complex relationship between gender, discourse, and (im)politeness. By examining an extended excerpt of interaction taken from the popular US reality TV show The Apprentice, I examine the role of gender stereotyping and gender assumptions in the assessment of (im)politeness by the discourse participants. Following Mills (2002), I shall argue that gender plays a role in the judgments of (im)politeness by the interactants, and that judgments seem to vary among individuals. The analysis shows that a woman's relatively masculine verbal behaviour, albeit politic in view of the stereotypically 'masculine' context, is perceived as inappropriate and impolite. It is suggested that women professionals may be subjected to more stringent gender norms which govern what constitutes polite behaviour, as linguistic behaviour may be evaluated against the 'norms' of women's speech which is assumed to be stereotypically more polite than men's speech. The analysis also raises the issue of a double bind (Lakoff 1975) that women may confront regularly in the work-place. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160757
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.604
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.282
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSung, CCMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:19:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:19:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Gender Studies, 2012, v. 21 n. 3, p. 285-300en_US
dc.identifier.issn0958-9236-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160757-
dc.description.abstractDrawing upon the method of discourse analysis, this article explores the complex relationship between gender, discourse, and (im)politeness. By examining an extended excerpt of interaction taken from the popular US reality TV show The Apprentice, I examine the role of gender stereotyping and gender assumptions in the assessment of (im)politeness by the discourse participants. Following Mills (2002), I shall argue that gender plays a role in the judgments of (im)politeness by the interactants, and that judgments seem to vary among individuals. The analysis shows that a woman's relatively masculine verbal behaviour, albeit politic in view of the stereotypically 'masculine' context, is perceived as inappropriate and impolite. It is suggested that women professionals may be subjected to more stringent gender norms which govern what constitutes polite behaviour, as linguistic behaviour may be evaluated against the 'norms' of women's speech which is assumed to be stereotypically more polite than men's speech. The analysis also raises the issue of a double bind (Lakoff 1975) that women may confront regularly in the work-place. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09589236.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Gender Studiesen_US
dc.subjectDiscourse analysis-
dc.subjectGender identity-
dc.subjectLanguage-
dc.subjectMedia-
dc.subjectPoliteness-
dc.titleExploring the interplay of gender, discourse, and (im)politenessen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSung, CCM: mccsung@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09589236.2012.681179-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865817693-
dc.identifier.hkuros204253en_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage285-
dc.identifier.epage300-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308241700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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