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Article: The "instrumentality" heuristic: Why metacognitive difficulty is desirable during goal pursuit

TitleThe "instrumentality" heuristic: Why metacognitive difficulty is desirable during goal pursuit
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PSCI
Citation
Psychological Science, 2009, v. 20 n. 1, p. 127-134 How to Cite?
AbstractThe literature overwhelmingly demonstrates that feelings of ease are good and that objects that are easy to process are much liked. We propose, and demonstrate across three experiments, that this is not the case when people are pursuing a goal. This is because people pursuing a goal (e.g., "become kinder") usually invest efforts in whichever means (e.g., donate to a particular charity) they perceive as most instrumental for attaining their goal. Consequently, in their minds there is a correspondence between instrumentality of a means and feelings of effort. This correspondence becomes reversed in people's minds during goal pursuit, and they also come to view an object that is associated with feelings of effort rather than ease as more instrumental for goal attainment and consequently more desirable. When an object is not a means to fulfill an accessible goal, or when goals relating to the means are not accessible, subjective feelings of ease improve evaluation, as found in previous research on ease of processing. © 2009 Association for Psychological Science.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157732
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.476
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.375
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Kilts Center of Marketing, Booth School of Business, University of Chicago
Funding Information:

Funding from the Kilts Center of Marketing, Booth School of Business, University of Chicago, is gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLabroo, AAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKim, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:13Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Science, 2009, v. 20 n. 1, p. 127-134en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0956-7976en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157732-
dc.description.abstractThe literature overwhelmingly demonstrates that feelings of ease are good and that objects that are easy to process are much liked. We propose, and demonstrate across three experiments, that this is not the case when people are pursuing a goal. This is because people pursuing a goal (e.g., "become kinder") usually invest efforts in whichever means (e.g., donate to a particular charity) they perceive as most instrumental for attaining their goal. Consequently, in their minds there is a correspondence between instrumentality of a means and feelings of effort. This correspondence becomes reversed in people's minds during goal pursuit, and they also come to view an object that is associated with feelings of effort rather than ease as more instrumental for goal attainment and consequently more desirable. When an object is not a means to fulfill an accessible goal, or when goals relating to the means are not accessible, subjective feelings of ease improve evaluation, as found in previous research on ease of processing. © 2009 Association for Psychological Science.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PSCIen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Scienceen_HK
dc.subject.meshAchievementen_US
dc.subject.meshArousalen_US
dc.subject.meshAttentionen_US
dc.subject.meshCultureen_US
dc.subject.meshEmotionsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGoalsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIndividualityen_US
dc.subject.meshInternal-External Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshJudgmenten_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Recallen_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshProblem Solvingen_US
dc.subject.meshReadingen_US
dc.subject.meshSet (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshStudents - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe "instrumentality" heuristic: Why metacognitive difficulty is desirable during goal pursuiten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKim, S: sarakim@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKim, S=rp01613en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02264.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19152545-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58149305645en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58149305645&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage127en_HK
dc.identifier.epage134en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262285200020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLabroo, AA=7801324596en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKim, S=37109323000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3895489-

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