File Download
 
 
Supplementary

Conference Paper: A case-study exploring the role of affect and culture in communicating bad news: technology triggers for problem based learning and practice
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleA case-study exploring the role of affect and culture in communicating bad news: technology triggers for problem based learning and practice
 
AuthorsLajoie, SP
Lu, J
Hmelo-Silver, C
Wiseman, J
Chan, LK
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherRoyal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
 
CitationThe 2011 Simulation Summit of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), Montreal, QC., 3-4 November 2011. [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractA case study is presented of an international technology rich learning module that uses a problem based learning video based approach to trigger student learning issues about giving bad news to HIV patients. The role of emotion and culture is explored in this context. Mixed groups of medical students from Canada and Hong Kong work with facilitators from each country. Technology supports PBL through the use of transparent examples of how experts solve cases involving physician-patient communication. Adobe connect supports the international model through synchronous video interaction and shared applications. After the instructional sessions, each student practices giving bad news to standardized patients using video-conferencing tools. Students receive feedback on their physician-patient communication from experts assessing their performance. The case study supports several types of data analyses. Pre-post test measures address students’ motivation and ability to identify the important aspects of physician-patient communication. The instructional discourse will be analyzed for: the type of affective content considered pertinent to each case, cultural differences between Canada and Hong Kong students, and types of instructor facilitation. The practice discourse with standardized patients examines student ability to transfer what they have learned from the instructional models to patient communication skills. We anticipate that medical students will improve their ability to regulate physician-patient communication. Such regulation will include cognitive, metacognitive, and emotional regulation of knowing what to do and when to do it, and knowing how to communicate in a manner that is most appropriate given a set of circumstances.
 
DescriptionPoster Presentations: abstract no. P-35
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLajoie, SP
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHmelo-Silver, C
 
dc.contributor.authorWiseman, J
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, LK
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T12:25:44Z
 
dc.date.available2012-07-16T12:25:44Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractA case study is presented of an international technology rich learning module that uses a problem based learning video based approach to trigger student learning issues about giving bad news to HIV patients. The role of emotion and culture is explored in this context. Mixed groups of medical students from Canada and Hong Kong work with facilitators from each country. Technology supports PBL through the use of transparent examples of how experts solve cases involving physician-patient communication. Adobe connect supports the international model through synchronous video interaction and shared applications. After the instructional sessions, each student practices giving bad news to standardized patients using video-conferencing tools. Students receive feedback on their physician-patient communication from experts assessing their performance. The case study supports several types of data analyses. Pre-post test measures address students’ motivation and ability to identify the important aspects of physician-patient communication. The instructional discourse will be analyzed for: the type of affective content considered pertinent to each case, cultural differences between Canada and Hong Kong students, and types of instructor facilitation. The practice discourse with standardized patients examines student ability to transfer what they have learned from the instructional models to patient communication skills. We anticipate that medical students will improve their ability to regulate physician-patient communication. Such regulation will include cognitive, metacognitive, and emotional regulation of knowing what to do and when to do it, and knowing how to communicate in a manner that is most appropriate given a set of circumstances.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.descriptionPoster Presentations: abstract no. P-35
 
dc.description.otherThe 2011 Simulation Summit of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), Montreal, QC., 3-4 November 2011.
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 2011 Simulation Summit of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), Montreal, QC., 3-4 November 2011. [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.hkuros201900
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153441
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoyal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
 
dc.publisher.placeCanada
 
dc.relation.ispartofRoyal College’s 2011 Simulation Summit
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.titleA case-study exploring the role of affect and culture in communicating bad news: technology triggers for problem based learning and practice
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Lajoie, SP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lu, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hmelo-Silver, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wiseman, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, LK</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-07-16T12:25:44Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-07-16T12:25:44Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>The 2011 Simulation Summit of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), Montreal, QC., 3-4 November 2011.</identifier.citation>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/153441</identifier.uri>
<description>Poster Presentations: abstract no. P-35</description>
<description.abstract>A case study is presented of an international technology rich learning module that uses a problem based learning video based approach to trigger student learning issues about giving bad news to HIV patients. The role of emotion and culture is explored in this context. Mixed groups of medical students from Canada and Hong Kong work with facilitators from each country. Technology supports PBL through the use of transparent examples of how experts solve cases involving physician-patient communication. Adobe connect supports the international model through synchronous video interaction and shared applications. After the instructional sessions, each student practices giving bad news to standardized patients using video-conferencing tools. Students receive feedback on their physician-patient communication from experts assessing their performance. The case study supports several types of data analyses. Pre-post test measures address students&#8217; motivation and ability to identify the important aspects of physician-patient communication. The instructional discourse will be analyzed for: the type of affective content considered pertinent to each case, cultural differences between Canada and Hong Kong students, and types of instructor facilitation. The practice discourse with standardized patients examines student ability to transfer what they have learned from the instructional models to patient communication skills. We anticipate that medical students will improve their ability to regulate physician-patient communication. Such regulation will include cognitive, metacognitive, and emotional regulation of knowing what to do and when to do it, and knowing how to communicate in a manner that is most appropriate given a set of circumstances.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Royal College&#8217;s 2011 Simulation Summit</relation.ispartof>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<title>A case-study exploring the role of affect and culture in communicating bad news: technology triggers for problem based learning and practice</title>
<type>Conference_Paper</type>
<description.nature>postprint</description.nature>
<identifier.hkuros>201900</identifier.hkuros>
<publisher.place>Canada</publisher.place>
<description.other>The 2011 Simulation Summit of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), Montreal, QC., 3-4 November 2011.</description.other>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/153441/1/Abstract.pdf</bitstream.url>
</item>