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Book Chapter: Genomics of hepatocellular carcinoma
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TitleGenomics of hepatocellular carcinoma
 
AuthorsWong, CM
Ng, IOL
 
KeywordsLiver -- Cancer.
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSpringer
 
CitationGenomics of hepatocellular carcinoma. In Gu, J (Ed.), Primary liver cancer : challenges and perspectives, p. 45-78. Heidelberg: Springer, 2012
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28702-2_3
Hepatocarcinogenesis is a multistep process developing from a normal liver through chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis to HCC. The pathogenesis of HCC is poorly understood at present. There is insufficient understanding to propose a robust general model of hepatic carcinogenesis, partly because the pathogenic host and environmental factors show significant regional variation, making such generalization difficult. However, with advances in molecular technology, there is a growing understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the development of HCC. In hepatocarcinogenesis, there is a strong link to increases in allelic losses, chromosomal changes, gene mutations, epigenetic alterations and alterations in molecular cellular pathways. In this chapter, special focus is placed on the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis, genetics, epigenetics and regulation of major signaling pathways involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. A detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis involved in the progression of HCC can improve our prevention and diagnostic tools for HCC and may help identify novel molecular targets for new therapies. [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28702-2_3
 
ISSN9783642287015
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28702-2_3
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWong, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, IOL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T10:12:38Z
 
dc.date.available2012-07-16T10:12:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.identifier.citationGenomics of hepatocellular carcinoma. In Gu, J (Ed.), Primary liver cancer : challenges and perspectives, p. 45-78. Heidelberg: Springer, 2012
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28702-2_3
 
dc.identifier.citationHepatocarcinogenesis is a multistep process developing from a normal liver through chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis to HCC. The pathogenesis of HCC is poorly understood at present. There is insufficient understanding to propose a robust general model of hepatic carcinogenesis, partly because the pathogenic host and environmental factors show significant regional variation, making such generalization difficult. However, with advances in molecular technology, there is a growing understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the development of HCC. In hepatocarcinogenesis, there is a strong link to increases in allelic losses, chromosomal changes, gene mutations, epigenetic alterations and alterations in molecular cellular pathways. In this chapter, special focus is placed on the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis, genetics, epigenetics and regulation of major signaling pathways involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. A detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis involved in the progression of HCC can improve our prevention and diagnostic tools for HCC and may help identify novel molecular targets for new therapies. [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28702-2_3
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28702-2_3
 
dc.identifier.epage78
 
dc.identifier.hkuros201253
 
dc.identifier.issn9783642287015
 
dc.identifier.spage45
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153398
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer
 
dc.publisher.placeHeidelberg
 
dc.relation.ispartofPrimary liver cancer : challenges and perspectives
 
dc.subjectLiver -- Cancer.
 
dc.titleGenomics of hepatocellular carcinoma
 
dc.typeBook_Chapter
 
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