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Article: The use of sex hormones in women with rheumatological diseases
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TitleThe use of sex hormones in women with rheumatological diseases
 
AuthorsLi, RHW1
Gebbie, AE2
Wong, RWS3
Ng, EHY1
Glasier, AF2
Ho, PC1
 
KeywordsArthritis
Contraceptives
Hormonal
Hormone replacement therapy
Lupus erythematosus
Oral
Rheumatic diseases
Rheumatoid
Systemic
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
 
CitationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2011, v. 17 n. 6, p. 487-491 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractA number of rheumatological diseases predominantly affect women of reproductive age. There has always been concern that the use of oestrogen-containing agents such as combined hormonal contraception and hormone therapy might aggravate these conditions. This article reviews the up-to-date evidence regarding the safety of using these agents in women with various rheumatological diseases, with emphasis on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In the absence of antiphospholipid antibody or other prothrombotic risk factors, combined hormonal contraception is not contra-indicated in most rheumatological conditions including inactive systemic lupus erythematosus. Moreover, hormone therapy is generally not contra-indicated except for women with active systemic lupus erythematosus disease where its effect on disease flare is less clear and individual judgement is required.
 
DescriptionAuthor Chinese name: Raymond HW Li 李幸奐, Ailsa E Gebbie, Raymond WS Wong 黃煥星, Ernest HY Ng 吳鴻裕, Anna F Glasier, PC Ho 何柏松
 
ISSN1024-2708
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.255
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, RHW
 
dc.contributor.authorGebbie, AE
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, RWS
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, EHY
 
dc.contributor.authorGlasier, AF
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, PC
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:52:55Z
 
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:52:55Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractA number of rheumatological diseases predominantly affect women of reproductive age. There has always been concern that the use of oestrogen-containing agents such as combined hormonal contraception and hormone therapy might aggravate these conditions. This article reviews the up-to-date evidence regarding the safety of using these agents in women with various rheumatological diseases, with emphasis on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In the absence of antiphospholipid antibody or other prothrombotic risk factors, combined hormonal contraception is not contra-indicated in most rheumatological conditions including inactive systemic lupus erythematosus. Moreover, hormone therapy is generally not contra-indicated except for women with active systemic lupus erythematosus disease where its effect on disease flare is less clear and individual judgement is required.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.descriptionAuthor Chinese name: Raymond HW Li 李幸奐, Ailsa E Gebbie, Raymond WS Wong 黃煥星, Ernest HY Ng 吳鴻裕, Anna F Glasier, PC Ho 何柏松
 
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2011, v. 17 n. 6, p. 487-491 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage491
 
dc.identifier.hkuros201400
 
dc.identifier.hkuros222176
 
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.255
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.pmid22147320
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-83255176267
 
dc.identifier.spage487
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152944
 
dc.identifier.volume17
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
 
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong
 
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshArthritis, Rheumatoid
 
dc.subject.meshContraceptives, Oral, Combined
 
dc.subject.meshContraceptives, Oral, Hormonal
 
dc.subject.meshHormone Replacement Therapy
 
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemic
 
dc.subjectArthritis
 
dc.subjectContraceptives
 
dc.subjectHormonal
 
dc.subjectHormone replacement therapy
 
dc.subjectLupus erythematosus
 
dc.subjectOral
 
dc.subjectRheumatic diseases
 
dc.subjectRheumatoid
 
dc.subjectSystemic
 
dc.titleThe use of sex hormones in women with rheumatological diseases
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Gebbie, AE</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Ng, EHY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Glasier, AF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, PC</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>A number of rheumatological diseases predominantly affect women of reproductive age. There has always been concern that the use of oestrogen-containing agents such as combined hormonal contraception and hormone therapy might aggravate these conditions. This article reviews the up-to-date evidence regarding the safety of using these agents in women with various rheumatological diseases, with emphasis on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In the absence of antiphospholipid antibody or other prothrombotic risk factors, combined hormonal contraception is not contra-indicated in most rheumatological conditions including inactive systemic lupus erythematosus. Moreover, hormone therapy is generally not contra-indicated except for women with active systemic lupus erythematosus disease where its effect on disease flare is less clear and individual judgement is required.</description.abstract>
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<subject>Arthritis</subject>
<subject>Contraceptives</subject>
<subject>Hormonal</subject>
<subject>Hormone replacement therapy</subject>
<subject>Lupus erythematosus</subject>
<subject>Oral</subject>
<subject>Rheumatic diseases</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Family Planning and Well Women Services
  3. Division of Rheumatology