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Article: Violence against pregnant women can increase the risk of child abuse: A longitudinal study

TitleViolence against pregnant women can increase the risk of child abuse: A longitudinal study
Authors
KeywordsChild abuse and neglect
Intimate partner violence
Pregnancy
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chiabuneg
Citation
Child Abuse And Neglect, 2012, v. 36 n. 4, p. 275-284 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To assess the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) against pregnant women on subsequent perpetration of child abuse and neglect (CAN) by parents; and to test the mediation effect of recent IPV on the link between IPV during pregnancy and subsequent CAN. Methods: This study was a longitudinal follow-up of a population-based study on pregnancy IPV conducted in antenatal clinics in 7 public hospitals in Hong Kong in 2005. Of all participants in the 2005 study, we recruited 487 women (with 184 having reported pregnancy IPV in the 2005 study) with newborn babies for a follow-up telephone interview in 2008. Participants responded to the Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS), the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale, and some questions assessing demographic information. Results: The most common form of physical violence was corporal punishment, with a prevalence rate of 75.1% in the preceding year and 75.4% over their lifetime. Physical maltreatment was less likely to be reported, accounting for 4.7% in the preceding year and 4.9% over their lifetime. The preceding-year and lifetime prevalence rates of neglect were 11.3% and 11.5%, respectively. Findings from logistic regression analyses showed that IPV experienced by participants during pregnancy was associated with greater odds of both lifetime (aOR. =. 1.74) and preceding-year child physical maltreatment (aOR. =. 1.78). Results of the regression analyses also provided supportive evidence for the mediation effect of recent IPV victimization on the relationship between IPV during pregnancy and recent CAN against children. Conclusion: IPV against women during pregnancy predicted subsequent CAN on newborns in Chinese populations. This underscores the importance of screening pregnant women for IPV in order to prevent CAN at an early stage. Home visitations are suggested to break the cycle of violence within a nuclear family. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152838
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.397
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.343
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBrownridge, DAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTiwari, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, PCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:50:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:50:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChild Abuse And Neglect, 2012, v. 36 n. 4, p. 275-284en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0145-2134en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152838-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To assess the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) against pregnant women on subsequent perpetration of child abuse and neglect (CAN) by parents; and to test the mediation effect of recent IPV on the link between IPV during pregnancy and subsequent CAN. Methods: This study was a longitudinal follow-up of a population-based study on pregnancy IPV conducted in antenatal clinics in 7 public hospitals in Hong Kong in 2005. Of all participants in the 2005 study, we recruited 487 women (with 184 having reported pregnancy IPV in the 2005 study) with newborn babies for a follow-up telephone interview in 2008. Participants responded to the Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS), the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale, and some questions assessing demographic information. Results: The most common form of physical violence was corporal punishment, with a prevalence rate of 75.1% in the preceding year and 75.4% over their lifetime. Physical maltreatment was less likely to be reported, accounting for 4.7% in the preceding year and 4.9% over their lifetime. The preceding-year and lifetime prevalence rates of neglect were 11.3% and 11.5%, respectively. Findings from logistic regression analyses showed that IPV experienced by participants during pregnancy was associated with greater odds of both lifetime (aOR. =. 1.74) and preceding-year child physical maltreatment (aOR. =. 1.78). Results of the regression analyses also provided supportive evidence for the mediation effect of recent IPV victimization on the relationship between IPV during pregnancy and recent CAN against children. Conclusion: IPV against women during pregnancy predicted subsequent CAN on newborns in Chinese populations. This underscores the importance of screening pregnant women for IPV in order to prevent CAN at an early stage. Home visitations are suggested to break the cycle of violence within a nuclear family. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chiabunegen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChild Abuse and Neglecten_HK
dc.subjectChild abuse and neglecten_HK
dc.subjectIntimate partner violenceen_HK
dc.subjectPregnancyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMarital Statusen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaternal Ageen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPaternal Ageen_HK
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPregnant Women - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPunishment - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRecurrenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpouse Abuse - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_HK
dc.titleViolence against pregnant women can increase the risk of child abuse: A longitudinal studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KL: eklchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTiwari, A: tiwari@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, PC: pcho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KL=rp00572en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTiwari, A=rp00441en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PC=rp00325en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chiabu.2011.12.003en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22565038-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861338578en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros201558en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861338578&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage275en_HK
dc.identifier.epage284en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1873-7757-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304841200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KL=8504873300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrownridge, DA=6601984986en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTiwari, A=7101772273en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WC=7201504435en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PC=7402211440en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10646737-

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