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Article: Diet and glucose tolerance in a Chinese population

TitleDiet and glucose tolerance in a Chinese population
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Diet
Glucose tolerance
Issue Date2003
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcn
Citation
European Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2003, v. 57 n. 4, p. 523-530 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Associations between dietary factors and glucose tolerance observed in Caucasian populations may not be applicable to Chinese populations, since the traditional Chinese diet contains plentiful vegetables and is rice-based (which has a lower glycemic index than potatoes). To address this question, the dietary patterns in 988 Hong Kong Chinese subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes, were examined in a cross sectional survey to determine if there is any association between diet and glucose tolerance. Method: A stratified random population sample of 988 subjects (488 male, 500 female) was recruited. A food frequency questionnaire was used to determine dietary intake, and glucose tolerance was examined using the glucose tolerance test and the WHO criteria used to classify subjects into the three glucose tolerance categories. Results: Using the standardized world population of Segi, the prevalence rate for DM was 6.6% for men and 5.7% for women; and for IGT 10.3% for men and 15.4% for women aged 30-64 y. Abnormal glucose tolerance is associated with female gender, older age, lower educational attainment and higher body mass index (BMI). No clear pattern of association with dietary factors was observed after adjusting for confounding factors. However, if subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 were excluded, an increase in mean consumption of rice/noodles/pasta per week was observed in the DM group, after adjusting for total energy intake and other confounding factors. No association between dietary variety, which has been linked with body fatness, and glucose tolerance, was observed. Conclusion: Dietary habit may not be a strong risk factor for the development of glucose intolerance in Chinese populations, given the favorable features of the Chinese diet. The high consumption of rice in the DM subjects who are of normal BMI suggests that further studies examining glycemic indices of Chinese food items may be beneficial. Obesity still remains the most important predisposing factor.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151578
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSea, MMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:24:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:24:55Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2003, v. 57 n. 4, p. 523-530en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151578-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Associations between dietary factors and glucose tolerance observed in Caucasian populations may not be applicable to Chinese populations, since the traditional Chinese diet contains plentiful vegetables and is rice-based (which has a lower glycemic index than potatoes). To address this question, the dietary patterns in 988 Hong Kong Chinese subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes, were examined in a cross sectional survey to determine if there is any association between diet and glucose tolerance. Method: A stratified random population sample of 988 subjects (488 male, 500 female) was recruited. A food frequency questionnaire was used to determine dietary intake, and glucose tolerance was examined using the glucose tolerance test and the WHO criteria used to classify subjects into the three glucose tolerance categories. Results: Using the standardized world population of Segi, the prevalence rate for DM was 6.6% for men and 5.7% for women; and for IGT 10.3% for men and 15.4% for women aged 30-64 y. Abnormal glucose tolerance is associated with female gender, older age, lower educational attainment and higher body mass index (BMI). No clear pattern of association with dietary factors was observed after adjusting for confounding factors. However, if subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 were excluded, an increase in mean consumption of rice/noodles/pasta per week was observed in the DM group, after adjusting for total energy intake and other confounding factors. No association between dietary variety, which has been linked with body fatness, and glucose tolerance, was observed. Conclusion: Dietary habit may not be a strong risk factor for the development of glucose intolerance in Chinese populations, given the favorable features of the Chinese diet. The high consumption of rice in the DM subjects who are of normal BMI suggests that further studies examining glycemic indices of Chinese food items may be beneficial. Obesity still remains the most important predisposing factor.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcnen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectDieten_HK
dc.subjectGlucose toleranceen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgingen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDieten_US
dc.subject.meshDiet Recordsen_US
dc.subject.meshDietary Carbohydrates - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intakeen_US
dc.subject.meshExerciseen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFruiten_US
dc.subject.meshGlucose Intolerance - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshOryza Sativaen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshVegetablesen_US
dc.titleDiet and glucose tolerance in a Chinese populationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601586en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12700613-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037728847en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros77994-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037728847&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage523en_HK
dc.identifier.epage530en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182505900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=16949717700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SC=7403716908en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, A=7004122137en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSea, MM=6602566931en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8302858-

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