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Article: 'She has received many honours': identity in article bio statements
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Title'She has received many honours': identity in article bio statements
 
AuthorsHyland, K1
Tse, P1
 
KeywordsAcademic writing
Biographical statement
Identity
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jeap
 
CitationJournal of English for Academic Purposes, 2012, v. 11 n. 2, p. 155-165 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2012.01.001
 
AbstractIn contrast to the prescribed anonymity of the research article, the bio which accompanies it is perhaps the most explicit assertion of self-representation in scholarly life. Here is a rhetorical space where, in 50-100 words, authors are able to craft a narrative of expertise for themselves. It is a key opening for academics, both novice and experienced, to manage a public image through the careful recounting of achievement. Yet despite the current interest in identity, the bio has largely escaped attention. In this paper we address this neglect through analysis of 600 bios across three disciplines, exploring the importance of discipline, status and gender in mediating the ways writers claim an identity. Our argument is that, despite its brevity, the bio is an important means of representing an academic self through the recognition of collective values and membership. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN1475-1585
2013 Impact Factor: 0.796
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.176
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2012.01.001
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000309322400009
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHyland, K
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, P
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:18:01Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:18:01Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractIn contrast to the prescribed anonymity of the research article, the bio which accompanies it is perhaps the most explicit assertion of self-representation in scholarly life. Here is a rhetorical space where, in 50-100 words, authors are able to craft a narrative of expertise for themselves. It is a key opening for academics, both novice and experienced, to manage a public image through the careful recounting of achievement. Yet despite the current interest in identity, the bio has largely escaped attention. In this paper we address this neglect through analysis of 600 bios across three disciplines, exploring the importance of discipline, status and gender in mediating the ways writers claim an identity. Our argument is that, despite its brevity, the bio is an important means of representing an academic self through the recognition of collective values and membership. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal of English for Academic Purposes, 2012, v. 11 n. 2, p. 155-165 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2012.01.001
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10411869
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2012.01.001
 
dc.identifier.epage165
 
dc.identifier.hkuros204331
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309322400009
 
dc.identifier.issn1475-1585
2013 Impact Factor: 0.796
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.176
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860681261
 
dc.identifier.spage155
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148714
 
dc.identifier.volume11
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jeap
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of English for Academic Purposes
 
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of English for Academic Purposes. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 2012, v. 11 n. 2, p. 155-165. DOI: 10.1016/j.jeap.2012.01.001
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectAcademic writing
 
dc.subjectBiographical statement
 
dc.subjectIdentity
 
dc.title'She has received many honours': identity in article bio statements
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong