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Article: Roles of Sox4 in central nervous system development

TitleRoles of Sox4 in central nervous system development
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/molbrainres
Citation
Molecular Brain Research, 2000, v. 79 n. 1-2, p. 180-191 How to Cite?
AbstractThe transcription factor-encoding gene, Sox4, is expressed in a wide range of tissues and has been shown to be functionally involved in heart, B-cell and reproductive system development. Sox4 shows a high degree of sequence homology with another group C Sox gene, Sox11, which is predominantly expressed in the CNS. Since the expression of Sox4 in the CNS has not been described we have carried out such a study. Sox4 and Sox11 expression increased simultaneously in the same early differentiating cells of the developing CNS except in the external granule layer of the cerebellum where Sox11 expression preceded that of Sox4. As development proceeded, their expression always appeared to relate to the maturational stage of the cell population, with Sox11 expression more transient than Sox4, except in the spinal cord where the reverse was true. Sox4 knock-out mice have been shown to die of a heart defect half way through gestation with no observable CNS phenotype. Our more detailed analysis showed no abnormality in the spatial restriction of expression of Sox2, Sox11, Mash1, neurogenin1 or neurogenin2, although the level of expression of Sox11 and Mash1 appeared a little different from the wild-type, implying that Sox4 might indeed have a functional role in CNS development. However, since Sox4 and Sox11 expression is so similar, we propose that Sox11 might compensate for the loss of Sox4 function in the CNS such that the phenotype is extremely mild in the Sox4 null mutant. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147456
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 1.997
2008 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.457
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorAbuElmagd, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorClevers, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorScotting, PJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:03:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:03:51Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationMolecular Brain Research, 2000, v. 79 n. 1-2, p. 180-191en_US
dc.identifier.issn0169-328Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147456-
dc.description.abstractThe transcription factor-encoding gene, Sox4, is expressed in a wide range of tissues and has been shown to be functionally involved in heart, B-cell and reproductive system development. Sox4 shows a high degree of sequence homology with another group C Sox gene, Sox11, which is predominantly expressed in the CNS. Since the expression of Sox4 in the CNS has not been described we have carried out such a study. Sox4 and Sox11 expression increased simultaneously in the same early differentiating cells of the developing CNS except in the external granule layer of the cerebellum where Sox11 expression preceded that of Sox4. As development proceeded, their expression always appeared to relate to the maturational stage of the cell population, with Sox11 expression more transient than Sox4, except in the spinal cord where the reverse was true. Sox4 knock-out mice have been shown to die of a heart defect half way through gestation with no observable CNS phenotype. Our more detailed analysis showed no abnormality in the spatial restriction of expression of Sox2, Sox11, Mash1, neurogenin1 or neurogenin2, although the level of expression of Sox11 and Mash1 appeared a little different from the wild-type, implying that Sox4 might indeed have a functional role in CNS development. However, since Sox4 and Sox11 expression is so similar, we propose that Sox11 might compensate for the loss of Sox4 function in the CNS such that the phenotype is extremely mild in the Sox4 null mutant. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/molbrainresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Brain Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAgingen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Embryology - Growth & Development - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic And Fetal Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulation, Developmentalen_US
dc.subject.meshHigh Mobility Group Proteins - Deficiency - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshMice, Knockouten_US
dc.subject.meshOrgan Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshSoxc Transcription Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTrans-Activators - Deficiency - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleRoles of Sox4 in central nervous system developmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, M:mcheung9@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, M=rp00245en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0169-328X(00)00109-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid10925158-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034705355en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034705355&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume79en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_US
dc.identifier.spage180en_US
dc.identifier.epage191en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088791000020-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, M=7201897461en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbuElmagd, M=6507443075en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridClevers, H=35594209900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridScotting, PJ=7003610298en_US

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