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Article: Prediction of remission and recovery in young people presenting with first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong: a 3-year follow-up study

TitlePrediction of remission and recovery in young people presenting with first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong: a 3-year follow-up study
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anp
Citation
Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 46 n. 2, p. 100-108 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to investigate the rates and predictors of symptomatic remission and recovery in patients presenting with first-episode psychosis 3 years after treatment initiation. METHODS: Seven hundred participants aged 15-25 years consecutively enrolled in a territory-wide early intervention programme in Hong Kong from July 2001 to August 2003 fulfilled study inclusion criteria, with 539 completing 3-year follow-up. Baseline and follow-up variables were collected via systematic medical file review. The operational criteria for recovery were based on clinical definition incorporating both symptom and functional dimensions. RESULTS: By the end of 3-year follow-up, 58.8% (n = 317) and 17.4% (n = 94) of participants met criteria for symptomatic remission and recovery, respectively. Around half (51.2%, n = 276) were not remitted either symptomatically or functionally in the last 12 months of follow-up. Of those who achieved sustained symptomatic remission, only 43.1% were also in functional remission. Patients in symptomatic remission had lower rate of admissions, shorter duration of hospitalisations and more favourable psychosocial functioning than non-remitted counterparts. Logistic regression analysis revealed that female sex, older age of onset of psychosis, shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and early symptom resolution predicted symptomatic remission at the end of follow-up. Higher educational attainment, superior baseline occupational status and shorter DUP were found to be predictive of recovery. CONCLUSION: In a large representative cohort of Chinese young people presenting with first-episode psychosis, although more than half achieved symptomatic remission 3 years after service entry, the rates of functional remission and recovery were low. More intensive psychosocial interventions may be required to further improve patients' functional outcome.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146910
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.269
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChang, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, YMJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, MMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:49:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:49:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 46 n. 2, p. 100-108en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146910-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to investigate the rates and predictors of symptomatic remission and recovery in patients presenting with first-episode psychosis 3 years after treatment initiation. METHODS: Seven hundred participants aged 15-25 years consecutively enrolled in a territory-wide early intervention programme in Hong Kong from July 2001 to August 2003 fulfilled study inclusion criteria, with 539 completing 3-year follow-up. Baseline and follow-up variables were collected via systematic medical file review. The operational criteria for recovery were based on clinical definition incorporating both symptom and functional dimensions. RESULTS: By the end of 3-year follow-up, 58.8% (n = 317) and 17.4% (n = 94) of participants met criteria for symptomatic remission and recovery, respectively. Around half (51.2%, n = 276) were not remitted either symptomatically or functionally in the last 12 months of follow-up. Of those who achieved sustained symptomatic remission, only 43.1% were also in functional remission. Patients in symptomatic remission had lower rate of admissions, shorter duration of hospitalisations and more favourable psychosocial functioning than non-remitted counterparts. Logistic regression analysis revealed that female sex, older age of onset of psychosis, shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and early symptom resolution predicted symptomatic remission at the end of follow-up. Higher educational attainment, superior baseline occupational status and shorter DUP were found to be predictive of recovery. CONCLUSION: In a large representative cohort of Chinese young people presenting with first-episode psychosis, although more than half achieved symptomatic remission 3 years after service entry, the rates of functional remission and recovery were low. More intensive psychosocial interventions may be required to further improve patients' functional outcome.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anp-
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatryen_HK
dc.rightsAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshRemission Induction-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.subject.meshPrognosis-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshRecurrence-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong-
dc.titlePrediction of remission and recovery in young people presenting with first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong: a 3-year follow-up studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, CL: christyh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, MM: maylam11@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SK: kwsherry@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, GH: ghywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChiu, CP: chiupyc@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EY: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, MM=rp00296en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SK=rp00539en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, CP=rp00291en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EY=rp00392-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0004867411428015en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22311526-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861684426en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199757en_US
dc.identifier.volume46en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage100en_HK
dc.identifier.epage108en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299901500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EY=7402315729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, CP=8627115700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, GH=24465754400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SK=55039018700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MM=13106178700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, CL=35734149500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, JY=35086815700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, WC=26643706700en_HK

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