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Article: Longitudinal changes in semantic categorization performance after symptomatic remission from first-episode psychosis: A 3-year follow-up study
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TitleLongitudinal changes in semantic categorization performance after symptomatic remission from first-episode psychosis: A 3-year follow-up study
 
AuthorsHui, CLM1
Longenecker, J1
Wong, GHY1
Tang, JYM1
Chang, WC1
Chan, SKW1
Lee, EHM1
Dunn, ELW2
Miao, MYK2
Yeung, WS2
Wong, CK2
Chan, WF2
Tang, WN2
Chen, EYH1
 
KeywordsCategorization
First episode
Schizophrenia
Semantic
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
 
CitationSchizophrenia Research, 2012, v. 137 n. 1-3, p. 118-123 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2012.02.010
 
AbstractSemantic categorization abnormalities have been observed in schizophrenia, but studies have rarely focused on the longitudinal trajectory. In this study, we consider semantic performance and the relationship with symptomatic changes during recovery from a first-episode of schizophrenia over a period of 3. years. Thirty-seven first-episode patients with schizophrenia were compared to thirty-seven matched controls in a categorization task. Patients were assessed at first episode, after clinical stabilization, and annually for the subsequent 3. years. In the task, participants indicated whether a word belonged to a given category. Each category contained words of varying degrees of semantic relatedness: typical, atypical, borderline, related-but-outside, and unrelated. Reaction times and proportion of 'yes' responses were analyzed. At first assessment, semantic categorization abnormalities were observed in first-episode patients. Patients assigned more semantically-dissimilar words to the categories than controls. As patients stabilized from acute states, their semantic categorization performance improved and then remained stable throughout the entire follow up period of 3. years. Interestingly, semantic performance deficits, particularly a diminished typicality effect, correlated with negative symptoms in the initial episode, but not at stabilization when symptoms subsided. No significant associations between positive and negative symptoms, or pre-defined categorization measures were identified. The data demonstrated semantic memory abnormalities in first-episode schizophrenia. However, an improvement of semantic categorization performance was observed in stabilized schizophrenia patients. Overall, the data are suggestive of a state effect in semantic abnormalities rather than a trait effect. The correlation between degree of impairment and symptoms may explain previous inconsistent findings. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
 
ISSN0920-9964
2013 Impact Factor: 4.426
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.163
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2012.02.010
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000303933800018
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong Kong21500.10202404
Janssen-Cilag
AstraZeneca
Pfizer
Eli Lilly
Sanofi-Aventis
Otsuka
Funding Information:

This work was supported by grant 21500.10202404 from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong. The Institutional Review Board ethics committees of the University of Hong Kong/ Hospital Authority Hong Kong West Cluster and Hong Kong East Cluster approved the study.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM
 
dc.contributor.authorLongenecker, J
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHY
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, JYM
 
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKW
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, EHM
 
dc.contributor.authorDunn, ELW
 
dc.contributor.authorMiao, MYK
 
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, WF
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, WN
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:49:15Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:49:15Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractSemantic categorization abnormalities have been observed in schizophrenia, but studies have rarely focused on the longitudinal trajectory. In this study, we consider semantic performance and the relationship with symptomatic changes during recovery from a first-episode of schizophrenia over a period of 3. years. Thirty-seven first-episode patients with schizophrenia were compared to thirty-seven matched controls in a categorization task. Patients were assessed at first episode, after clinical stabilization, and annually for the subsequent 3. years. In the task, participants indicated whether a word belonged to a given category. Each category contained words of varying degrees of semantic relatedness: typical, atypical, borderline, related-but-outside, and unrelated. Reaction times and proportion of 'yes' responses were analyzed. At first assessment, semantic categorization abnormalities were observed in first-episode patients. Patients assigned more semantically-dissimilar words to the categories than controls. As patients stabilized from acute states, their semantic categorization performance improved and then remained stable throughout the entire follow up period of 3. years. Interestingly, semantic performance deficits, particularly a diminished typicality effect, correlated with negative symptoms in the initial episode, but not at stabilization when symptoms subsided. No significant associations between positive and negative symptoms, or pre-defined categorization measures were identified. The data demonstrated semantic memory abnormalities in first-episode schizophrenia. However, an improvement of semantic categorization performance was observed in stabilized schizophrenia patients. Overall, the data are suggestive of a state effect in semantic abnormalities rather than a trait effect. The correlation between degree of impairment and symptoms may explain previous inconsistent findings. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSchizophrenia Research, 2012, v. 137 n. 1-3, p. 118-123 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2012.02.010
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10513738
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2012.02.010
 
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2509
 
dc.identifier.epage123
 
dc.identifier.hkuros199748
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303933800018
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong Kong21500.10202404
Janssen-Cilag
AstraZeneca
Pfizer
Eli Lilly
Sanofi-Aventis
Otsuka
Funding Information:

This work was supported by grant 21500.10202404 from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong. The Institutional Review Board ethics committees of the University of Hong Kong/ Hospital Authority Hong Kong West Cluster and Hong Kong East Cluster approved the study.

 
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964
2013 Impact Factor: 4.426
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.163
 
dc.identifier.issue1-3
 
dc.identifier.pmid22449835
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863394865
 
dc.identifier.spage118
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146904
 
dc.identifier.volume137
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectCategorization
 
dc.subjectFirst episode
 
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
 
dc.subjectSemantic
 
dc.titleLongitudinal changes in semantic categorization performance after symptomatic remission from first-episode psychosis: A 3-year follow-up study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital