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Article: Liver fibrosis: An intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) study
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TitleLiver fibrosis: An intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) study
 
AuthorsChow, AM1
Gao, DS1
Fan, SJ1
Qiao, Z1
Lee, FY1
Yang, J1
Man, K1
Wu, EX1
 
KeywordsCCl 4
diffusion imaging
IVIM
liver fibrosis
MRI
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/
 
CitationJournal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2012, v. 36 n. 1, p. 159-167 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.23607
 
AbstractPurpose: To characterize longitudinal changes in molecular water diffusion, blood microcirculation, and their contributions to the apparent diffusion changes using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) analysis in an experimental mouse model of liver fibrosis. Materials and Methods: Liver fibrosis was induced in male adult C57BL/6N mice (22-25 g; n = 12) by repetitive dosing of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4). The respiratory-gated diffusion-weighted (DW) images were acquired using single-shot spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI) with 8 b-values and single diffusion gradient direction. True diffusion coefficient (D true), blood pseudodiffusion coefficient (D pseudo), and perfusion fraction (P fraction) were measured. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was also performed for comparison. Histology was performed with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. Results: A significant decrease in D true was found at 2 weeks and 4 weeks following CCl 4 insult, as compared with that before insult. Similarly, D pseudo values before injury was significantly higher than those at 2 weeks and 4 weeks after CCl 4 insult. Meanwhile, P fraction values showed no significant differences over different timepoints. For DTI, significant decrease in ADC was observed following CCl 4 administration. Fractional anisotropy at 2 weeks after CCl 4 insult was significantly lower than that before insult, and subsequently normalized at 4 weeks after the insult. Liver histology showed collagen deposition, the presence of intracellular fat vacuoles, and cell necrosis/apoptosis in livers with CCl 4 insult. Conclusion: Both molecular water diffusion and blood microcirculation contribute to the alteration in apparent diffusion changes in liver fibrosis. Reduction in D true and D pseudo values resulted from diffusion and perfusion changes, respectively, during the progression of liver fibrosis. IVIM analysis may serve as valuable and robust tool in detecting and characterizing liver fibrosis at early stages, monitoring its progression in a noninvasive manner. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
DescriptionThis work was presented as an oral presentation at the 19th Annual Meeting of International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 7–13 May, 2011.
 
ISSN1053-1807
2012 Impact Factor: 2.566
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.330
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.23607
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000305185700015
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilGRF HKU 7826/10M
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Research Grant Council; Contract grant number: GRF HKU 7826/10M.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChow, AM
 
dc.contributor.authorGao, DS
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, SJ
 
dc.contributor.authorQiao, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, FY
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, J
 
dc.contributor.authorMan, K
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:00:47Z
 
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:00:47Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To characterize longitudinal changes in molecular water diffusion, blood microcirculation, and their contributions to the apparent diffusion changes using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) analysis in an experimental mouse model of liver fibrosis. Materials and Methods: Liver fibrosis was induced in male adult C57BL/6N mice (22-25 g; n = 12) by repetitive dosing of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4). The respiratory-gated diffusion-weighted (DW) images were acquired using single-shot spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI) with 8 b-values and single diffusion gradient direction. True diffusion coefficient (D true), blood pseudodiffusion coefficient (D pseudo), and perfusion fraction (P fraction) were measured. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was also performed for comparison. Histology was performed with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. Results: A significant decrease in D true was found at 2 weeks and 4 weeks following CCl 4 insult, as compared with that before insult. Similarly, D pseudo values before injury was significantly higher than those at 2 weeks and 4 weeks after CCl 4 insult. Meanwhile, P fraction values showed no significant differences over different timepoints. For DTI, significant decrease in ADC was observed following CCl 4 administration. Fractional anisotropy at 2 weeks after CCl 4 insult was significantly lower than that before insult, and subsequently normalized at 4 weeks after the insult. Liver histology showed collagen deposition, the presence of intracellular fat vacuoles, and cell necrosis/apoptosis in livers with CCl 4 insult. Conclusion: Both molecular water diffusion and blood microcirculation contribute to the alteration in apparent diffusion changes in liver fibrosis. Reduction in D true and D pseudo values resulted from diffusion and perfusion changes, respectively, during the progression of liver fibrosis. IVIM analysis may serve as valuable and robust tool in detecting and characterizing liver fibrosis at early stages, monitoring its progression in a noninvasive manner. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionThis work was presented as an oral presentation at the 19th Annual Meeting of International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 7–13 May, 2011.
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2012, v. 36 n. 1, p. 159-167 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.23607
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.23607
 
dc.identifier.epage167
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198967
 
dc.identifier.hkuros206799
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305185700015
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilGRF HKU 7826/10M
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Research Grant Council; Contract grant number: GRF HKU 7826/10M.

 
dc.identifier.issn1053-1807
2012 Impact Factor: 2.566
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.330
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid22334528
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862740631
 
dc.identifier.spage159
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145889
 
dc.identifier.volume36
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
dc.subjectCCl 4
 
dc.subjectdiffusion imaging
 
dc.subjectIVIM
 
dc.subjectliver fibrosis
 
dc.subjectMRI
 
dc.titleLiver fibrosis: An intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong