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Article: Service learning in medical and nursing training: A randomized controlled trial
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TitleService learning in medical and nursing training: A randomized controlled trial
 
AuthorsLeung, AYM1 2
Chan, SSC1
Kwan, CW2
Cheung, MKT1
Leung, SSK1
Fong, DYT1
 
KeywordsAttitude
Knowledge about aging
Medical and nursing students
Older adults
Service learning
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1382-4996
 
CitationAdvances In Health Sciences Education, 2012, v. 17 n. 4, p. 529-545 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10459-011-9329-9
 
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the long term effect of a service learning project on medical and nursing students' knowledge in aging and their attitudes toward older adults. A total of 124 students were recruited and then randomized to intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). A pre-and-post-intervention design measured students' knowledge in aging (using modified Palmore's Fact on Aging Quiz) and attitudes toward older adults (using Kogan's Old People Scale). A total of 103 students completed all the activities and questionnaires. After the intervention, there were significant differences between the IG and CG on Palmore's mental health (MH) (P =.04), Palmore's total score (P =.02) and Kogan's negative attitudes toward older adults (P =.001). All students increased their positive attitude toward older adults after the intervention. However, both the IG and CG showed a decrease in positive attitudes 1 month after the interventon, and such decrease varied, depending on the programme which students attended. The current study showed that the 10-week service learning activities significantly increased medical and nursing students' overall knowledge of aging and their understanding of mental health needs in old age, and reduced their negative attitudes toward older adults. However, the effect is not long-lasting. On the other hand, its effect on positive attitudes toward older adults cannot be concluded. Periodic contacts with older adults via service learning activities may be needed to sustain attitude change toward older adults. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
ISSN1382-4996
2012 Impact Factor: 2.061
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.843
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10459-011-9329-9
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYM
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSC
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MKT
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSK
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-21T05:43:15Z
 
dc.date.available2012-02-21T05:43:15Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the long term effect of a service learning project on medical and nursing students' knowledge in aging and their attitudes toward older adults. A total of 124 students were recruited and then randomized to intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). A pre-and-post-intervention design measured students' knowledge in aging (using modified Palmore's Fact on Aging Quiz) and attitudes toward older adults (using Kogan's Old People Scale). A total of 103 students completed all the activities and questionnaires. After the intervention, there were significant differences between the IG and CG on Palmore's mental health (MH) (P =.04), Palmore's total score (P =.02) and Kogan's negative attitudes toward older adults (P =.001). All students increased their positive attitude toward older adults after the intervention. However, both the IG and CG showed a decrease in positive attitudes 1 month after the interventon, and such decrease varied, depending on the programme which students attended. The current study showed that the 10-week service learning activities significantly increased medical and nursing students' overall knowledge of aging and their understanding of mental health needs in old age, and reduced their negative attitudes toward older adults. However, the effect is not long-lasting. On the other hand, its effect on positive attitudes toward older adults cannot be concluded. Periodic contacts with older adults via service learning activities may be needed to sustain attitude change toward older adults. © 2011 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 21 Feb 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Health Sciences Education, 2012, v. 17 n. 4, p. 529-545 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10459-011-9329-9
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9876918
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10459-011-9329-9
 
dc.identifier.eissn1573-1677
 
dc.identifier.epage545
 
dc.identifier.hkuros202309
 
dc.identifier.issn1382-4996
2012 Impact Factor: 2.061
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.843
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21964953
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84866122695
 
dc.identifier.spage529
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144938
 
dc.identifier.volume17
 
dc.languageEng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1382-4996
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Health Sciences Education
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectAttitude
 
dc.subjectKnowledge about aging
 
dc.subjectMedical and nursing students
 
dc.subjectOlder adults
 
dc.subjectService learning
 
dc.titleService learning in medical and nursing training: A randomized controlled trial
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong