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Article: De-stigmatising human papillomavirus in the context of cervical cancer: A randomised controlled trial

TitleDe-stigmatising human papillomavirus in the context of cervical cancer: A randomised controlled trial
Authors
Keywordscervical cancer
Chinese women
HPV education
human papillomavirus
oncology
stigma
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2010, v. 19 n. 12, p. 1329-1339 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To identify the components of a human papillomavirus (HPV) message contributing to reducing the stigma of HPV in cervical cancer. Methods: 294 ethnic Chinese women attending a community-based clinic in Hong Kong were randomly allocated to read one of three written HPV messages: Group 'lr+hrHPV': low-risk and high-risk HPVs facts, Group 'hrHPV': high-risk HPV facts only and Group 'ds+hrHPV': high-risk HPV facts and de-stigmatising components, namely being anti-stereotypical, motivational and low in complexity. Main outcome measures were high-risk HPV-related sexual stigma, knowledge, attitude towards message, and intention to be HPV-tested measured by self-administered questionnaires immediately before and after reading. Results: Message allocation had a significant effect on sexual stigma (F=5.219, p=0.006). Participants who read message ds+hrHPV showed the least stigma, and were significantly less likely to believe that high-risk HPV infection implicated promiscuity, non-monogamy or that monogamy offered complete protection against high-risk HPV. The genital HPV-focused message was more stigmatising than cervical cancer-focused messages. Of all participants, 93% (237/254) and 97% (260/269) indicated a positive intention to be HPV-tested before and after reading, respectively. There were no between-group differences noted in terms of knowledge and intention to be HPV-tested before or after reading. Conclusions: Our findings show that an HPV message containing specific de-stigmatising components may reduce public stigma towards high-risk HPV. Also, focusing solely on high-risk HPV in the context of cervical cancer helps to avoid the stigmatising effect of genital warts from tainting perceptions about high-risk HPV infection. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144827
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong
Wong Check She Charitable Foundation
GSK Limited
Funding Information:

We would like to thank the staff of the Wanchai Birth Control Clinic of the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong for their assistance with participant recruitment. T. K. was responsible for the trial design, recruitment, protocol administration, data collection, entry and analyses and manuscript preparation. K. T. and P. L. were co-writers of the manuscript. H. N. was the principal investigator and supervised the conduct of the trial. S. L. coordinated the logistics for trial implementation in the centre. All authors were involved in the design of the interventions and review of the manuscript. The trial was jointly funded by the Research Fund of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong, The Wong Check She Charitable Foundation and a cervical cancer education grant by GSK Limited. The funders were not involved in any stage of the trial or preparation and submission of the manuscript. The work of the authors was independent of the funders.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwan, TTCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, SSTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-06T08:16:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-06T08:16:26Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2010, v. 19 n. 12, p. 1329-1339en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/144827-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To identify the components of a human papillomavirus (HPV) message contributing to reducing the stigma of HPV in cervical cancer. Methods: 294 ethnic Chinese women attending a community-based clinic in Hong Kong were randomly allocated to read one of three written HPV messages: Group 'lr+hrHPV': low-risk and high-risk HPVs facts, Group 'hrHPV': high-risk HPV facts only and Group 'ds+hrHPV': high-risk HPV facts and de-stigmatising components, namely being anti-stereotypical, motivational and low in complexity. Main outcome measures were high-risk HPV-related sexual stigma, knowledge, attitude towards message, and intention to be HPV-tested measured by self-administered questionnaires immediately before and after reading. Results: Message allocation had a significant effect on sexual stigma (F=5.219, p=0.006). Participants who read message ds+hrHPV showed the least stigma, and were significantly less likely to believe that high-risk HPV infection implicated promiscuity, non-monogamy or that monogamy offered complete protection against high-risk HPV. The genital HPV-focused message was more stigmatising than cervical cancer-focused messages. Of all participants, 93% (237/254) and 97% (260/269) indicated a positive intention to be HPV-tested before and after reading, respectively. There were no between-group differences noted in terms of knowledge and intention to be HPV-tested before or after reading. Conclusions: Our findings show that an HPV message containing specific de-stigmatising components may reduce public stigma towards high-risk HPV. Also, focusing solely on high-risk HPV in the context of cervical cancer helps to avoid the stigmatising effect of genital warts from tainting perceptions about high-risk HPV infection. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subjectcervical canceren_HK
dc.subjectChinese womenen_HK
dc.subjectHPV educationen_HK
dc.subjecthuman papillomavirusen_HK
dc.subjectoncologyen_HK
dc.subjectstigmaen_HK
dc.subject.meshConsumer Health Information - methods-
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice-
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infections - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology-
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention and control - virology-
dc.titleDe-stigmatising human papillomavirus in the context of cervical cancer: A randomised controlled trialen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KKL:kklchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS:hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KKL=rp00499en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1706en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20186874-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649926201en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros170767-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649926201&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1329en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1339en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285662900011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwan, TTC=16063821800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, KF=7201692816en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PWH=7406120357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, SST=8718876900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KKL=8655666700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_HK

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