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Article: Quitting trajectories of chinese youth smokers following telephone smoking cessation counseling: A longitudinal study

TitleQuitting trajectories of chinese youth smokers following telephone smoking cessation counseling: A longitudinal study
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ntr.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Nicotine And Tobacco Research, 2011, v. 13 n. 9, p. 848-859 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The smoking patterns of youth remain unknown after they have received smoking cessation counseling. This study aims to examine the quitting trajectories of Chinese youth smokers after they have received quitline services and to examine factors to predict their quitting trajectories. Methods: A total of 402 Chinese youth smokers (aged 12-25 years) called a quitline and participated in telephone follow-ups at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 and 6 months after initial telephone counseling. Finite mixture modeling was employed to examine the quitting trajectories by the SAS Proc Traj group-based modeling procedure. Hierarchical multinomial logistic regression was used to compare the baseline intention to quit smoking, prosmoking attitudes, social influences, self-efficacy to quit, smoking profile, quitting history, and demographic characteristics among the trajectory groups. Results: Three distinct quitting trajectory groups were identified: quitters, reducers, and persistent smokers. Both quitters and reducers dramatically reduced the level of their cigarette consumption immediately after initial counseling. Youth smokers who were intended to quit at baseline, perceived confidence to quit, and perceived importance of quitting were more likely to have successfully quit smoking at six-month follow-up. Those who had prosmoking attitudes were less likely to quit smoking. Conclusion: The findings reveal the profiles of youth smokers who can quit successfully and can guide the development of better and relevant interventions based on the psychosocial characteristics of youth smokers. Short-term goals such as an abrupt quit attempt or immediately reducing cigarette consumption by half may be the key to help youth smokers quit successfully. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143787
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.811
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health Care Promotion Fund of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR government18040084
Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health
Funding Information:

Health Care Promotion Fund of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR government (Youth Quitline project, #18040084); Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DCNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, DOen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T08:55:45Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-21T08:55:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNicotine And Tobacco Research, 2011, v. 13 n. 9, p. 848-859en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1462-2203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/143787-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The smoking patterns of youth remain unknown after they have received smoking cessation counseling. This study aims to examine the quitting trajectories of Chinese youth smokers after they have received quitline services and to examine factors to predict their quitting trajectories. Methods: A total of 402 Chinese youth smokers (aged 12-25 years) called a quitline and participated in telephone follow-ups at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 and 6 months after initial telephone counseling. Finite mixture modeling was employed to examine the quitting trajectories by the SAS Proc Traj group-based modeling procedure. Hierarchical multinomial logistic regression was used to compare the baseline intention to quit smoking, prosmoking attitudes, social influences, self-efficacy to quit, smoking profile, quitting history, and demographic characteristics among the trajectory groups. Results: Three distinct quitting trajectory groups were identified: quitters, reducers, and persistent smokers. Both quitters and reducers dramatically reduced the level of their cigarette consumption immediately after initial counseling. Youth smokers who were intended to quit at baseline, perceived confidence to quit, and perceived importance of quitting were more likely to have successfully quit smoking at six-month follow-up. Those who had prosmoking attitudes were less likely to quit smoking. Conclusion: The findings reveal the profiles of youth smokers who can quit successfully and can guide the development of better and relevant interventions based on the psychosocial characteristics of youth smokers. Short-term goals such as an abrupt quit attempt or immediately reducing cigarette consumption by half may be the key to help youth smokers quit successfully. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ntr.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNicotine and Tobacco Researchen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshCounseling - methods-
dc.subject.meshHotlines-
dc.subject.meshSmoking - epidemiology - prevention and control - psychology-
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation - methods - psychology-
dc.titleQuitting trajectories of chinese youth smokers following telephone smoking cessation counseling: A longitudinal studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, AYM: angleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, DO: debbie@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, T: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, AYM=rp00405en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, DO=rp00571en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, T=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ntr/ntr086en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21571689-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052777614en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198045en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052777614&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage848en_HK
dc.identifier.epage859en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294815200011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectYouth Quitline: an accessible telephone-based smoking cessation hotline for youth-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DCN=24391473100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SSC=7404255378en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, AYM=7403012650en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, DO=7201749390en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, T=7202522876en_HK

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