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Article: Quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen levels in patients with chronic hepatitis B after 2 years of entecavir treatment
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TitleQuantitative hepatitis B surface antigen levels in patients with chronic hepatitis B after 2 years of entecavir treatment
 
AuthorsFung, J1
Lai, CL1
Young, J1
Wong, DKH1
Yuen, J1
Seto, WK1
Yuen, MF1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2011, v. 106 n. 10, p. 1766-1773 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.253
 
AbstractObjectives: The role of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels in patients receiving oral antiviral therapy is controversial. We aimed to determine the HBsAg response in chronic hepatitis B patients treated with entecavir 0.5 mg daily for 2 years. Methods: A total of 166 patients were included. Liver biochemistry, hepatitis B virus (HBV) serological markers, HBV DNA, and quantitative HBsAg levels were performed at baseline, year 1, and year 2 after commencing entecavir. Additional HBsAg levels were measured at 12 and 24 weeks in patients with available sera. Results: In all, 68 patients were hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) positive. Age, HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were significantly correlated with HBsAg levels at baseline (r=-0.429, 0.607, and 0.254, respectively, all P<0.05). The correlation with HBV DNA and ALT levels was reduced by entecavir treatment, and was lost after 2 years of treatment. There was an overall decline in HBsAg levels from baseline to year 1 to year 2 (3,377.4 vs. 2,316.5 vs. 1,903.0 IU/ml, respectively, P<0.001). However, at year 2, 102 patients (61%) had no significant changes (<0.5 log difference), 50 (30%) had significant decline (≥0.5 log decrease), whereas 14 (9%) had significant increase (0.5 log increase). Of the patients, 151 (91%) had undetectable HBV DNA; 25 (37%) underwent HBeAg seroconversion. Neither HBsAg at baseline nor early decline at weeks 12 or 24 was predictive of HBeAg seroconversion at 2 years. Conclusions: Despite HBV DNA suppression, the majority did not show significant decline in HBsAg levels. Early decline of HBsAg levels at 12/24 weeks was not associated with HBV DNA suppression or HBeAg seroconversion. © 2011 by the American College of Gastroenterology.
 
ISSN0002-9270
2013 Impact Factor: 9.213
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.253
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000295926600005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorFung, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorYoung, J
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, DKH
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, J
 
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MF
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T02:44:56Z
 
dc.date.available2011-10-28T02:44:56Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The role of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels in patients receiving oral antiviral therapy is controversial. We aimed to determine the HBsAg response in chronic hepatitis B patients treated with entecavir 0.5 mg daily for 2 years. Methods: A total of 166 patients were included. Liver biochemistry, hepatitis B virus (HBV) serological markers, HBV DNA, and quantitative HBsAg levels were performed at baseline, year 1, and year 2 after commencing entecavir. Additional HBsAg levels were measured at 12 and 24 weeks in patients with available sera. Results: In all, 68 patients were hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) positive. Age, HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were significantly correlated with HBsAg levels at baseline (r=-0.429, 0.607, and 0.254, respectively, all P<0.05). The correlation with HBV DNA and ALT levels was reduced by entecavir treatment, and was lost after 2 years of treatment. There was an overall decline in HBsAg levels from baseline to year 1 to year 2 (3,377.4 vs. 2,316.5 vs. 1,903.0 IU/ml, respectively, P<0.001). However, at year 2, 102 patients (61%) had no significant changes (<0.5 log difference), 50 (30%) had significant decline (≥0.5 log decrease), whereas 14 (9%) had significant increase (0.5 log increase). Of the patients, 151 (91%) had undetectable HBV DNA; 25 (37%) underwent HBeAg seroconversion. Neither HBsAg at baseline nor early decline at weeks 12 or 24 was predictive of HBeAg seroconversion at 2 years. Conclusions: Despite HBV DNA suppression, the majority did not show significant decline in HBsAg levels. Early decline of HBsAg levels at 12/24 weeks was not associated with HBV DNA suppression or HBeAg seroconversion. © 2011 by the American College of Gastroenterology.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2011, v. 106 n. 10, p. 1766-1773 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.253
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.253
 
dc.identifier.epage1773
 
dc.identifier.hkuros196659
 
dc.identifier.hkuros213672
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295926600005
 
dc.identifier.issn0002-9270
2013 Impact Factor: 9.213
 
dc.identifier.issue10
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21826112
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053894414
 
dc.identifier.spage1766
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/142389
 
dc.identifier.volume106
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAntiviral Agents - administration and dosage - therapeutic use
 
dc.subject.meshGuanine - administration and dosage - analogs and derivatives - therapeutic use
 
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B Surface Antigens - blood
 
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B virus - genetics - immunology - isolation and purification
 
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B, Chronic - drug therapy - enzymology - immunology
 
dc.titleQuantitative hepatitis B surface antigen levels in patients with chronic hepatitis B after 2 years of entecavir treatment
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong