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Conference Paper: Using glycosylated haemoglobin to define the metabolic syndrome in adults in the United States

TitleUsing glycosylated haemoglobin to define the metabolic syndrome in adults in the United States
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
Citation
The 16th Medical Research Conference of the Department of Medicine, Hong Kong, China, 22 January 2011. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2011, v. 17 n. 1, p. 20, abstract no. 21 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Recently, the American Diabetes Association has proposed the use of glycosylated haemoglobin (GHb) in the definition of diabetes and the category of increased diabetes risk. We therefore investigated whether GHb can be used instead of fasting plasma glucose in identifying individuals with the metabolic syndrome, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Methods: Participants of the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2006 who had fasting blood glucose were included (n=3551 in 1999-2002 and n=3412 in 2003-2006). The metabolic syndrome was defined using International Diabetes Federation criteria in 2009. Raised blood glucose was defined either as fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L), or as GHb ≥5.7%. Results: In 2003-2006, there was 91.3% agreement between GHb and fasting glucose when either is used to define the metabolic syndrome, although the use of GHb slightly lowered the syndrome’s prevalence (34.8% vs 38.8%, P=0.012). The agreement was good (≥87%) irrespective of age, sex, race/ethnicity and body mass index. Only 2.3% of the sample population had the metabolic syndrome defined using GHb but not using fasting glucose. The syndrome, defined using GHb alone, was associated with cardiovascular diseases (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure or stroke) [OR=1.95, P=0.002]. Similar results were found in 1999-2002. Conclusions: Using GHb instead of fasting glucose to define the metabolic syndrome is feasible. The syndrome defined in this way also identifies individuals with increased cardiovascular risk.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140574
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY-
dc.contributor.authorOng, KL-
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWK-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL-
dc.contributor.authorCherny, SS-
dc.contributor.authorSham, PC-
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:15:07Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:15:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationThe 16th Medical Research Conference of the Department of Medicine, Hong Kong, China, 22 January 2011. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2011, v. 17 n. 1, p. 20, abstract no. 21-
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140574-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Recently, the American Diabetes Association has proposed the use of glycosylated haemoglobin (GHb) in the definition of diabetes and the category of increased diabetes risk. We therefore investigated whether GHb can be used instead of fasting plasma glucose in identifying individuals with the metabolic syndrome, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Methods: Participants of the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2006 who had fasting blood glucose were included (n=3551 in 1999-2002 and n=3412 in 2003-2006). The metabolic syndrome was defined using International Diabetes Federation criteria in 2009. Raised blood glucose was defined either as fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L), or as GHb ≥5.7%. Results: In 2003-2006, there was 91.3% agreement between GHb and fasting glucose when either is used to define the metabolic syndrome, although the use of GHb slightly lowered the syndrome’s prevalence (34.8% vs 38.8%, P=0.012). The agreement was good (≥87%) irrespective of age, sex, race/ethnicity and body mass index. Only 2.3% of the sample population had the metabolic syndrome defined using GHb but not using fasting glucose. The syndrome, defined using GHb alone, was associated with cardiovascular diseases (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure or stroke) [OR=1.95, P=0.002]. Similar results were found in 1999-2002. Conclusions: Using GHb instead of fasting glucose to define the metabolic syndrome is feasible. The syndrome defined in this way also identifies individuals with increased cardiovascular risk.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal-
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleUsing glycosylated haemoglobin to define the metabolic syndrome in adults in the United States-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailOng, KL: okl2000@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTso, AWK: awktso@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCherny, SS: cherny@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321-
dc.identifier.authorityTso, AWK=rp00535-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343-
dc.identifier.authorityCherny, SS=rp00232-
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros194412-
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage20, abstract no. 21-
dc.identifier.epage20, abstract no. 21-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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