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Article: Impact of Baby-Friendly Hospital Practices on Breastfeeding in Hong Kong
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TitleImpact of Baby-Friendly Hospital Practices on Breastfeeding in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsTarrant, M2
Wu, KM2
Fong, DYT2
Lee, ILY6
Wong, EMY4
Sham, A1
Lam, C5
Dodgson, JE3
 
KeywordsBaby-Friendly Hospital Initiative
Breastfeeding
Exclusive breastfeeding
Hong Kong
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BIR
 
CitationBirth, 2011, v. 38 n. 3, p. 238-245 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2011.00483.x
 
AbstractBackground: The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative to improve hospital maternity care practices that support breastfeeding. In Hong Kong, although no hospitals have yet received the Baby-Friendly status, efforts have been made to improve breastfeeding support. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of Baby-Friendly hospital practices on breastfeeding duration. Methods: A sample of 1,242 breastfeeding mother-infant pairs was recruited from four public hospitals in Hong Kong and followed up prospectively for up to 12months. The primary outcome variable was defined as breastfeeding for 8weeks or less. Predictor variables included six Baby-Friendly practices: breastfeeding initiation within 1hour of birth, exclusive breastfeeding while in hospital, rooming-in, breastfeeding on demand, no pacifiers or artificial nipples, and information on breastfeeding support groups provided on discharge. Results: Only 46.6 percent of women breastfed for more than 8weeks, and only 4.8 percent of mothers experienced all six Baby-Friendly practices. After controlling for all other Baby-Friendly practices and possible confounding variables, exclusive breastfeeding while in hospital was protective against early breastfeeding cessation (OR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.42-0.88). Compared with mothers who experienced all six Baby-Friendly practices, those who experienced one or fewer Baby-Friendly practices were almost three times more likely to discontinue breastfeeding (OR: 3.13; 95% CI: 1.41-6.95). Conclusions: Greater exposure to Baby-Friendly practices would substantially increase new mothers' chances of breastfeeding beyond 8weeks postpartum. To further improve maternity care practices in hospitals, institutional and administrative support are required to ensure all mothers receive adequate breastfeeding support in accordance with WHO guidelines. (BIRTH 38:3 September 2011) © 2011, the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
ISSN0730-7659
2013 Impact Factor: 2.048
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2011.00483.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000294602400008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong SAR05060721
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR10207306
University of Hong Kong
School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Funding for this study was provided by the Health and Health Services Research Fund, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 05060721), the University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 10207306), the University of Hong Kong Strategic Research Theme of Public Health, and the School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsChanging infant feeding models: impact of cessation of complimentary infant formula in public hospitals on the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, M
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, ILY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, EMY
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, A
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, C
 
dc.contributor.authorDodgson, JE
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:12:10Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:12:10Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative to improve hospital maternity care practices that support breastfeeding. In Hong Kong, although no hospitals have yet received the Baby-Friendly status, efforts have been made to improve breastfeeding support. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of Baby-Friendly hospital practices on breastfeeding duration. Methods: A sample of 1,242 breastfeeding mother-infant pairs was recruited from four public hospitals in Hong Kong and followed up prospectively for up to 12months. The primary outcome variable was defined as breastfeeding for 8weeks or less. Predictor variables included six Baby-Friendly practices: breastfeeding initiation within 1hour of birth, exclusive breastfeeding while in hospital, rooming-in, breastfeeding on demand, no pacifiers or artificial nipples, and information on breastfeeding support groups provided on discharge. Results: Only 46.6 percent of women breastfed for more than 8weeks, and only 4.8 percent of mothers experienced all six Baby-Friendly practices. After controlling for all other Baby-Friendly practices and possible confounding variables, exclusive breastfeeding while in hospital was protective against early breastfeeding cessation (OR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.42-0.88). Compared with mothers who experienced all six Baby-Friendly practices, those who experienced one or fewer Baby-Friendly practices were almost three times more likely to discontinue breastfeeding (OR: 3.13; 95% CI: 1.41-6.95). Conclusions: Greater exposure to Baby-Friendly practices would substantially increase new mothers' chances of breastfeeding beyond 8weeks postpartum. To further improve maternity care practices in hospitals, institutional and administrative support are required to ensure all mothers receive adequate breastfeeding support in accordance with WHO guidelines. (BIRTH 38:3 September 2011) © 2011, the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBirth, 2011, v. 38 n. 3, p. 238-245 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2011.00483.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2011.00483.x
 
dc.identifier.eissn1523-536X
 
dc.identifier.epage245
 
dc.identifier.hkuros193012
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294602400008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong SAR05060721
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR10207306
University of Hong Kong
School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Funding for this study was provided by the Health and Health Services Research Fund, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 05060721), the University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 10207306), the University of Hong Kong Strategic Research Theme of Public Health, and the School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong.

 
dc.identifier.issn0730-7659
2013 Impact Factor: 2.048
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid21884232
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052417851
 
dc.identifier.spage238
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140460
 
dc.identifier.volume38
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BIR
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofBirth
 
dc.relation.projectChanging infant feeding models: impact of cessation of complimentary infant formula in public hospitals on the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
 
dc.subject.meshBreast Feeding - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshGuideline Adherence - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotion
 
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Public - standards
 
dc.subject.meshMaternal Health Services - standards
 
dc.subjectBaby-Friendly Hospital Initiative
 
dc.subjectBreastfeeding
 
dc.subjectExclusive breastfeeding
 
dc.subjectHong Kong
 
dc.titleImpact of Baby-Friendly Hospital Practices on Breastfeeding in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Kwong Wah Hospital
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Arizona State University at the Downtown Phoenix campus
  4. Hong Kong Institute of Education
  5. Queen Elizabeth Hospital Hong Kong
  6. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong