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Conference Paper: Role of genetic variants in gene encoding lipocalin-2 in the development of elevated blood pressure
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TitleRole of genetic variants in gene encoding lipocalin-2 in the development of elevated blood pressure
 
AuthorsCheung, BMY
Ong, KL
Tso, AWK
Cherny, SS
Sham, PC
Lam, TH
Lam, KSL
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
 
CitationThe 16th Medical Research Conference, Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China, 22 January 2011. In the Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2011, v. 17 n. 1, Suppl. 1, p. 17, abstract no. 15 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractIntroduction: Lipocalin-2 is recently recognised as a biomarker of obesity and inflammation, which are both risk factors for hypertension. We therefore investigated the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding lipocalin-2 (LCN2) with elevated blood pressure in Hong Kong Chinese. Methods: Five tagging SNPs were genotyped in 1936 subjects from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study-2 (CRISPS-2) with a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Elevated blood pressure was defined as ≥130/85 mm Hg or taking anti-hypertensive medication. Results: There were only two haplotypes with frequency of >5%, namely AGATC (45.5%) and GGTCC (41.2%). Haplotype GGTCC was associated with elevated blood pressure at follow-up (OR=1.17 compared to haplotype AGATC, P=0.031 after adjusting for age and sex). Among 1381 subjects without elevated blood pressure at baseline, 321 subjects developed elevated blood pressure at follow-up. Haplotype GGTCC was associated with the development of elevated blood pressure at follow-up (OR=1.30 compared to haplotype AGATC, P=0.011 after adjusting for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and follow-up duration; OR=1.44, P=0.0015 after further adjusting for other covariates). Among subjects not taking anti-hypertensive medication, carriers of the haplotype GGTCC had higher systolic blood pressure than non-carriers (119.7±16.4 mm Hg vs 117.9±17.3 mm Hg, P=0.043). Conclusion: Our findings suggest, for the first time, that genetic variants in LCN2 may affect blood pressure. Further studies on the role of lipocalin-2 in blood pressure regulation are warranted. Acknowledgement: This study was funded by Hong Kong Research Grant Council grants (HKU7229/01M and HKU7626/07M) and the Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation.
 
ISSN1024-2708
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.293
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY
 
dc.contributor.authorOng, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWK
 
dc.contributor.authorCherny, SS
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, PC
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:08:05Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:08:05Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Lipocalin-2 is recently recognised as a biomarker of obesity and inflammation, which are both risk factors for hypertension. We therefore investigated the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding lipocalin-2 (LCN2) with elevated blood pressure in Hong Kong Chinese. Methods: Five tagging SNPs were genotyped in 1936 subjects from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study-2 (CRISPS-2) with a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Elevated blood pressure was defined as ≥130/85 mm Hg or taking anti-hypertensive medication. Results: There were only two haplotypes with frequency of >5%, namely AGATC (45.5%) and GGTCC (41.2%). Haplotype GGTCC was associated with elevated blood pressure at follow-up (OR=1.17 compared to haplotype AGATC, P=0.031 after adjusting for age and sex). Among 1381 subjects without elevated blood pressure at baseline, 321 subjects developed elevated blood pressure at follow-up. Haplotype GGTCC was associated with the development of elevated blood pressure at follow-up (OR=1.30 compared to haplotype AGATC, P=0.011 after adjusting for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and follow-up duration; OR=1.44, P=0.0015 after further adjusting for other covariates). Among subjects not taking anti-hypertensive medication, carriers of the haplotype GGTCC had higher systolic blood pressure than non-carriers (119.7±16.4 mm Hg vs 117.9±17.3 mm Hg, P=0.043). Conclusion: Our findings suggest, for the first time, that genetic variants in LCN2 may affect blood pressure. Further studies on the role of lipocalin-2 in blood pressure regulation are warranted. Acknowledgement: This study was funded by Hong Kong Research Grant Council grants (HKU7229/01M and HKU7626/07M) and the Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 16th Medical Research Conference, Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China, 22 January 2011. In the Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2011, v. 17 n. 1, Suppl. 1, p. 17, abstract no. 15 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage17, abstract no. 15
 
dc.identifier.hkuros194406
 
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.293
 
dc.identifier.issue1, Suppl. 1
 
dc.identifier.spage17, abstract no. 15
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140170
 
dc.identifier.volume17
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
 
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong
 
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal
 
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.titleRole of genetic variants in gene encoding lipocalin-2 in the development of elevated blood pressure
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<item><contributor.author>Cheung, BMY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ong, KL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tso, AWK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cherny, SS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sham, PC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, KSL</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-09-23T06:08:05Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-09-23T06:08:05Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>The 16th Medical Research Conference, Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China, 22 January 2011. In the Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2011, v. 17  n. 1, Suppl. 1, p. 17, abstract no. 15</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1024-2708</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/140170</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Introduction: Lipocalin-2 is recently recognised as a biomarker of obesity and inflammation, which are both risk
factors for hypertension. We therefore investigated the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)
in the gene encoding lipocalin-2 (LCN2) with elevated blood pressure in Hong Kong Chinese.
Methods: Five tagging SNPs were genotyped in 1936 subjects from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor
Prevalence Study-2 (CRISPS-2) with a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Elevated blood pressure was defined as
&#8805;130/85 mm Hg or taking anti-hypertensive medication.
Results: There were only two haplotypes with frequency of &gt;5%, namely AGATC (45.5%) and GGTCC (41.2%).
Haplotype GGTCC was associated with elevated blood pressure at follow-up (OR=1.17 compared to haplotype
AGATC, P=0.031 after adjusting for age and sex). Among 1381 subjects without elevated blood pressure at baseline,
321 subjects developed elevated blood pressure at follow-up. Haplotype GGTCC was associated with the development
of elevated blood pressure at follow-up (OR=1.30 compared to haplotype AGATC, P=0.011 after adjusting for age,
sex, systolic blood pressure, and follow-up duration; OR=1.44, P=0.0015 after further adjusting for other covariates).
Among subjects not taking anti-hypertensive medication, carriers of the haplotype GGTCC had higher systolic blood
pressure than non-carriers (119.7&#177;16.4 mm Hg vs 117.9&#177;17.3 mm Hg, P=0.043).
Conclusion: Our findings suggest, for the first time, that genetic variants in LCN2 may affect blood pressure. Further
studies on the role of lipocalin-2 in blood pressure regulation are warranted.
Acknowledgement: This study was funded by Hong Kong Research Grant Council grants (HKU7229/01M and HKU7626/07M)
and the Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation.</description.abstract>
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<rights>Hong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright &#169; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.</rights>
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<title>Role of genetic variants in gene encoding lipocalin-2 in the development of elevated blood pressure</title>
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<identifier.hkuros>194406</identifier.hkuros>
<identifier.volume>17</identifier.volume>
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