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Conference Paper: Negative symptoms and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder

TitleNegative symptoms and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR 2011), Colorado Spring, CO., 2-6 April 2011. In Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2011, v. 37 suppl. 1, p. 240 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Negative symptoms and neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia are found to be correlated cross-sectionally but their longitudinal relationship remains unclear. Most studies focused on chronic illness and negative symptoms were examined as single construct instead of its subdomains. We aimed to investigate relationship between diminished expression and neurocognition in patients presenting with first-episode schizophrenia utilizing a prospective design. Methods: Ninety-three subjects (42 males, 51 females, mean age: 31.2) with first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or schizophreniform disorder were followed up for 3 years during which regular assessment in neurocognition and symptoms were conducted. Neurocognitive assessments included Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), digit span, verbal fluency, visual reproduction and logical memory. Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI)and PANSS were administered to evaluate neurological soft signs and clinical symptoms respectively. Severity of Diminished Expression (DE) was sum of item scores in Affect, Behaviour and Speech subscales of High Royds Evaluation of Negativity Scale (Mortimer et al. 1989). Results: Neurocognitive deficits were correlated with severity of DE on a cross-sectional basis. When sex, educational level, DUP, chlorpromazine equivalent, positive symptoms, drug-induced Parkinsonism and depression were controlled, regression analysis showed that at year 1, DE was significantly associated with verbal fluency (R square = .12, P < .01); at year 2, DE was predictive of WCST perseverative error (R square = .12, P < .001), WCST categories completed (R square = .10, P < .001), visual reproduction (R square = .16, P = .01) and CNI-motor coordination (R square = .18, P < .05); at year 3, DE was significantly associated with verbal fluency (R square = .09, P < .05) and forward digit span (R square = .05, P <.05). Longitudinally, change ofDE rating (and PANSS negative symptoms score) was uncorrelated with neurocognitive change over 3 years. Baseline DE was not associated with neuropsychological performance at year 3. Conclusion: Neurocognitive deficits and DE were correlated in successive assessments but longitudinal association between changes of these 2 domains in first-episode schizophrenia could not be demonstrated. Our findings indicated that negative symptoms and cognitive deficits are separable illness domains with potentially related underlying neurobiological abnormalities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139681
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.757
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.051
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChang, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, HYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, YMJen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, YHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:54:01Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:54:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR 2011), Colorado Spring, CO., 2-6 April 2011. In Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2011, v. 37 suppl. 1, p. 240en_US
dc.identifier.issn0586-7614-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139681-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Negative symptoms and neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia are found to be correlated cross-sectionally but their longitudinal relationship remains unclear. Most studies focused on chronic illness and negative symptoms were examined as single construct instead of its subdomains. We aimed to investigate relationship between diminished expression and neurocognition in patients presenting with first-episode schizophrenia utilizing a prospective design. Methods: Ninety-three subjects (42 males, 51 females, mean age: 31.2) with first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or schizophreniform disorder were followed up for 3 years during which regular assessment in neurocognition and symptoms were conducted. Neurocognitive assessments included Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), digit span, verbal fluency, visual reproduction and logical memory. Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI)and PANSS were administered to evaluate neurological soft signs and clinical symptoms respectively. Severity of Diminished Expression (DE) was sum of item scores in Affect, Behaviour and Speech subscales of High Royds Evaluation of Negativity Scale (Mortimer et al. 1989). Results: Neurocognitive deficits were correlated with severity of DE on a cross-sectional basis. When sex, educational level, DUP, chlorpromazine equivalent, positive symptoms, drug-induced Parkinsonism and depression were controlled, regression analysis showed that at year 1, DE was significantly associated with verbal fluency (R square = .12, P < .01); at year 2, DE was predictive of WCST perseverative error (R square = .12, P < .001), WCST categories completed (R square = .10, P < .001), visual reproduction (R square = .16, P = .01) and CNI-motor coordination (R square = .18, P < .05); at year 3, DE was significantly associated with verbal fluency (R square = .09, P < .05) and forward digit span (R square = .05, P <.05). Longitudinally, change ofDE rating (and PANSS negative symptoms score) was uncorrelated with neurocognitive change over 3 years. Baseline DE was not associated with neuropsychological performance at year 3. Conclusion: Neurocognitive deficits and DE were correlated in successive assessments but longitudinal association between changes of these 2 domains in first-episode schizophrenia could not be demonstrated. Our findings indicated that negative symptoms and cognitive deficits are separable illness domains with potentially related underlying neurobiological abnormalities.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Bulletin-
dc.titleNegative symptoms and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorderen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, LM: christyh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, ML: maylam11@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, HY: ghywong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, YH: eyhchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, ML=rp00296en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, YH=rp00392en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/schbul/sbq173-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3044641-
dc.identifier.hkuros194597en_US
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage240en_US
dc.identifier.epage240en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1745-1701-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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