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Article: Vascular actions of adipokines. Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications

TitleVascular actions of adipokines. Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications
Authors
KeywordsAdipokines
Adiponectin
Adipose tissue
Endothelial dysfunction
Inflammation
Obesity
Issue Date2010
PublisherAcademic Press.
Citation
Advances In Pharmacology, 2010, v. 60 C, p. 230-255 How to Cite?
AbstractAdipose tissue is a critical regulator of vascular function, which until recently had been virtually ignored. Almost all blood vessels are surrounded by perivascular adipose tissue, which is actively involved in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis by producing "vasocrine" signals such as adipokines. Adiponectin and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP), both of which are major adipokines predominantly produced in adipose tissue, have recently been shown to be pivotal modulators of vascular function. Adiponectin has multiple beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. It prevents obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction by inducing nitric oxide production, suppressing endothelial cell activation, inhibiting reactive oxygen species and apoptosis, and promoting endothelial cell repair. By contrast, A-FABP plays a detrimental role in vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis, mainly by acting as a lipid sensor to transmit toxic lipids-induced vascular inflammation through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Decreased production of adiponectin and/or elevated expression of A-FABP are important contributors to the pathogenesis of obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. This chapter highlights recent advances in both clinical investigations and animal studies promoting the understanding of the roles of adiponectin and A-FABP in the modulation of vascular function, and discusses the possibilities of using these two adipokines as therapeutic targets to design new drugs for preventing vascular disease associated with obesity and diabetes. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139498
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.718
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:50:39Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:50:39Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Pharmacology, 2010, v. 60 C, p. 230-255en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1054-3589en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139498-
dc.description.abstractAdipose tissue is a critical regulator of vascular function, which until recently had been virtually ignored. Almost all blood vessels are surrounded by perivascular adipose tissue, which is actively involved in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis by producing "vasocrine" signals such as adipokines. Adiponectin and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP), both of which are major adipokines predominantly produced in adipose tissue, have recently been shown to be pivotal modulators of vascular function. Adiponectin has multiple beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. It prevents obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction by inducing nitric oxide production, suppressing endothelial cell activation, inhibiting reactive oxygen species and apoptosis, and promoting endothelial cell repair. By contrast, A-FABP plays a detrimental role in vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis, mainly by acting as a lipid sensor to transmit toxic lipids-induced vascular inflammation through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Decreased production of adiponectin and/or elevated expression of A-FABP are important contributors to the pathogenesis of obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. This chapter highlights recent advances in both clinical investigations and animal studies promoting the understanding of the roles of adiponectin and A-FABP in the modulation of vascular function, and discusses the possibilities of using these two adipokines as therapeutic targets to design new drugs for preventing vascular disease associated with obesity and diabetes. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press.-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subjectAdipokinesen_HK
dc.subjectAdiponectinen_HK
dc.subjectAdipose tissueen_HK
dc.subjectEndothelial dysfunctionen_HK
dc.subjectInflammationen_HK
dc.subjectObesityen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdipokines - metabolism - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBlood Vessels - drug effects - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.titleVascular actions of adipokines. Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implicationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, Y: yuwanghk@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM: vanhoutt@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, Y=rp00239en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-385061-4.00008-8en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21081220-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78349237728en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195690en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros184652-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78349237728&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume60en_HK
dc.identifier.issueCen_HK
dc.identifier.spage230en_HK
dc.identifier.epage255en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, A=7202655409en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Y=34973733700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_HK

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