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Article: The presentation of self in scholarly life: Identity and marginalization in academic homepages

TitleThe presentation of self in scholarly life: Identity and marginalization in academic homepages
Authors
KeywordsAcademic discourse
Corporate branding
Homepages
Identity
Multimodal texts
Issue Date2011
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/esp
Citation
English For Specific Purposes, 2011, v. 30 n. 4, p. 286-297 How to Cite?
AbstractThe academic homepage is now a ubiquitous genre of scholarly life, but despite considerable interest in issues of identity and the ways individuals self-consciously manage the impression they give of themselves, it has been slow to attract the attention of ESP researchers. This may be because of the institutional control exercised by employing universities over this genre which tends to marginalize its subjects. The personal homepages of academics, however, offer considerable insights into disciplinary communities and the construction of a public identity in the context of corporate branding. In this paper, I explore 100 academic homepages in two contrasting fields, subdivided by rank and gender, to identify the extent of this marginalization and the space remaining to academics. Through an analysis of what is said and how it is presented, as text, design and hyperlinks, I show how individuals are positioned by corporate discourses yet manage to carve a sense of self to assert professional credibility. The analysis shows something of how language interacts with other semiotic resources in this environment and how seniority, gender and disciplinary membership cross-cut institutional representations of academics as employees. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138194
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.143
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.659
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:42:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:42:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnglish For Specific Purposes, 2011, v. 30 n. 4, p. 286-297en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0889-4906en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138194-
dc.description.abstractThe academic homepage is now a ubiquitous genre of scholarly life, but despite considerable interest in issues of identity and the ways individuals self-consciously manage the impression they give of themselves, it has been slow to attract the attention of ESP researchers. This may be because of the institutional control exercised by employing universities over this genre which tends to marginalize its subjects. The personal homepages of academics, however, offer considerable insights into disciplinary communities and the construction of a public identity in the context of corporate branding. In this paper, I explore 100 academic homepages in two contrasting fields, subdivided by rank and gender, to identify the extent of this marginalization and the space remaining to academics. Through an analysis of what is said and how it is presented, as text, design and hyperlinks, I show how individuals are positioned by corporate discourses yet manage to carve a sense of self to assert professional credibility. The analysis shows something of how language interacts with other semiotic resources in this environment and how seniority, gender and disciplinary membership cross-cut institutional representations of academics as employees. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/espen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnglish for Specific Purposesen_HK
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in English For Specific Purposes. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in English For Specific Purposes, 2011, v. 30 n. 4, p. 286-297. DOI: 10.1016/j.esp.2011.04.004-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAcademic discourseen_HK
dc.subjectCorporate brandingen_HK
dc.subjectHomepagesen_HK
dc.subjectIdentityen_HK
dc.subjectMultimodal textsen_HK
dc.titleThe presentation of self in scholarly life: Identity and marginalization in academic homepagesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K:khyland@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, K=rp01133en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.esp.2011.04.004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80955180503en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros190356en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80955180503&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage286en_HK
dc.identifier.epage297en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1873-1937-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295243400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9418150-

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