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Article: Staging of uterine sarcomas

TitleStaging of uterine sarcomas
Authors
Keywordsadenosarcoma
carcinosarcoma
endometrial stromal sarcoma
leiomyosarcoma
staging
undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma
Issue Date2011
PublisherBailliere Tindall. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bpobgyn
Citation
Best Practice And Research: Clinical Obstetrics And Gynaecology, 2011, v. 25 n. 6, p. 733-749 How to Cite?
AbstractUterine sarcomas comprise leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, adenosarcoma, undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma, and their variants. Carcinosarcoma is historically classified as sarcoma, but it is now regarded as a metaplastic carcinoma. Uterine sarcomas are rare, and are traditionally staged in the same way as endometrial carcinoma. Because of their different clinical and biological behaviours, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics introduced a new staging system in 2009 for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma and adenosarcoma, and carcinosarcoma, respectively. Following an extensive literature review no good evidence was found to support the modification of the staging system. This is mainly because of the rarity of the sarcomas and the heterogeneity of the reports, the different diagnostic criteria and treatments changing over the decades the retrospective nature and small sample size in most studies, and the lack of uniform pathological review even in large studies. Currently, evidence is still lacking about the use of preoperative imaging for staging purpose, and uterine sarcomas remain to be surgically staged. Total hysterectomy is the cornerstone for both staging and treatment. Newer evidence shows that routine lymphadenectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may not be necessary, unless in the presence of extra-uterine spread, suspicious ovaries or lymph nodes, and certain poor histological types, such as undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma and adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth. More research and data collection are definitely needed in order to verify and further revise the current staging systems. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137615
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.291
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.123
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:29:13Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:29:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBest Practice And Research: Clinical Obstetrics And Gynaecology, 2011, v. 25 n. 6, p. 733-749en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1521-6934en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137615-
dc.description.abstractUterine sarcomas comprise leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, adenosarcoma, undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma, and their variants. Carcinosarcoma is historically classified as sarcoma, but it is now regarded as a metaplastic carcinoma. Uterine sarcomas are rare, and are traditionally staged in the same way as endometrial carcinoma. Because of their different clinical and biological behaviours, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics introduced a new staging system in 2009 for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma and adenosarcoma, and carcinosarcoma, respectively. Following an extensive literature review no good evidence was found to support the modification of the staging system. This is mainly because of the rarity of the sarcomas and the heterogeneity of the reports, the different diagnostic criteria and treatments changing over the decades the retrospective nature and small sample size in most studies, and the lack of uniform pathological review even in large studies. Currently, evidence is still lacking about the use of preoperative imaging for staging purpose, and uterine sarcomas remain to be surgically staged. Total hysterectomy is the cornerstone for both staging and treatment. Newer evidence shows that routine lymphadenectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may not be necessary, unless in the presence of extra-uterine spread, suspicious ovaries or lymph nodes, and certain poor histological types, such as undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma and adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth. More research and data collection are definitely needed in order to verify and further revise the current staging systems. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBailliere Tindall. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bpobgynen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBest Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecologyen_HK
dc.subjectadenosarcomaen_HK
dc.subjectcarcinosarcomaen_HK
dc.subjectendometrial stromal sarcomaen_HK
dc.subjectleiomyosarcomaen_HK
dc.subjectstagingen_HK
dc.subjectundifferentiated endometrial sarcomaen_HK
dc.titleStaging of uterine sarcomasen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS:hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2011.05.011en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21752716-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80055027957en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros190734en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80055027957&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage733en_HK
dc.identifier.epage749en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297390600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, KY=8876026900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCrawford, R=7402584619en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_HK

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