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Conference Paper: Physical Activity Intervention in Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
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TitlePhysical Activity Intervention in Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
 
AuthorsHo, JWC
Hui, B
Fong, DYT
Macfarlane, DJ
Lee, AM
Leung, SSK
Cerin, E
Chan, W
Leung, I
Lam, S
Taylor, AJ
Cheng, KK
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherThe National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI).
 
CitationThe 6th National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference, Liverpool, UK, 7-10 November 2010 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractBackground The aim was to systematically review all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which tested the effect of a physical activity intervention in adult cancer survivors after the main cancer treatment. Method Relevant RCTs were located by: (1) systematic searching of electronic databases (PUBMED and Google Scholar) using cancer-related and exercise-related search terms; and (2) scanning the references of retrieved RCTs and relevant reviews. All relevant RCTs were retrieved and assessed to determine if they met the selection criteria. Data extraction was independently performed by two investigators and followed by a discussion to reach consensus. The main outcome measures were cancer outcome (survival and recurrence), quality of life (QoL), body composition and functional capacity. Results A total of 2,447 citations were identified of which 170 potentially relevant ones were examined in detail. Forty-five papers met the selection criteria of which 41 reported data on at least one relevant outcome. These encompassed 18 papers not included in previously published reviews. Twenty-six papers (63.4%) were on breast cancers and the remaining papers were on other cancers. There was a paucity of published data on the effects of physical activity interventions on cancer outcome. Various instruments were used to assess the other outcomes (QoL and functional capacity) limiting the pooling of data for meta-analysis. Estimates of the effects of physical activity interventions on QoL, body composition and functional capacity were determined. Potential determinants of the effect heterogeneity across studies were evaluated. Conclusion Moderately-strong-to-strong evidence was found for a positive effect of physical activity interventions on QoL of adult cancer survivors following main cancer treatment. Clinically meaningful associations were identified between such interventions and improved functional capacity. The observed heterogeneity in study design and outcome parameters highlighted the need for the development of a standardized protocol to facilitate meta-analysis on the effects of physical activity in cancer survivors. Acknowledgements This study has been supported by WCRF UK, WCRF International and WCRF Hong Kong.
 
DescriptionProffered paper session: Information, patients and the public/ Survivorship and end of life care
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHo, JWC
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, B
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT
 
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, DJ
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, AM
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSK
 
dc.contributor.authorCerin, E
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, W
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, I
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, AJ
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:17:39Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:17:39Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractBackground The aim was to systematically review all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which tested the effect of a physical activity intervention in adult cancer survivors after the main cancer treatment. Method Relevant RCTs were located by: (1) systematic searching of electronic databases (PUBMED and Google Scholar) using cancer-related and exercise-related search terms; and (2) scanning the references of retrieved RCTs and relevant reviews. All relevant RCTs were retrieved and assessed to determine if they met the selection criteria. Data extraction was independently performed by two investigators and followed by a discussion to reach consensus. The main outcome measures were cancer outcome (survival and recurrence), quality of life (QoL), body composition and functional capacity. Results A total of 2,447 citations were identified of which 170 potentially relevant ones were examined in detail. Forty-five papers met the selection criteria of which 41 reported data on at least one relevant outcome. These encompassed 18 papers not included in previously published reviews. Twenty-six papers (63.4%) were on breast cancers and the remaining papers were on other cancers. There was a paucity of published data on the effects of physical activity interventions on cancer outcome. Various instruments were used to assess the other outcomes (QoL and functional capacity) limiting the pooling of data for meta-analysis. Estimates of the effects of physical activity interventions on QoL, body composition and functional capacity were determined. Potential determinants of the effect heterogeneity across studies were evaluated. Conclusion Moderately-strong-to-strong evidence was found for a positive effect of physical activity interventions on QoL of adult cancer survivors following main cancer treatment. Clinically meaningful associations were identified between such interventions and improved functional capacity. The observed heterogeneity in study design and outcome parameters highlighted the need for the development of a standardized protocol to facilitate meta-analysis on the effects of physical activity in cancer survivors. Acknowledgements This study has been supported by WCRF UK, WCRF International and WCRF Hong Kong.
 
dc.descriptionProffered paper session: Information, patients and the public/ Survivorship and end of life care
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 6th National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference, Liverpool, UK, 7-10 November 2010 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.hkuros187135
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136525
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI).
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofThe National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
 
dc.titlePhysical Activity Intervention in Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Ho, JWC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hui, B</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fong, DYT</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Macfarlane, DJ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lee, AM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Leung, SSK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cerin, E</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, W</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Leung, I</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Taylor, AJ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheng, KK</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-07-27T02:17:39Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-07-27T02:17:39Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2010</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>The 6th National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference, Liverpool, UK, 7-10 November 2010</identifier.citation>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/136525</identifier.uri>
<description>Proffered paper session: Information, patients and the public/ Survivorship and end of life care</description>
<description.abstract>Background

The aim was to systematically review all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which tested the effect of a physical activity intervention in adult cancer survivors after the main cancer treatment.

Method

Relevant RCTs were located by: (1) systematic searching of electronic databases (PUBMED and Google Scholar) using cancer-related and exercise-related search terms; and (2) scanning the references of retrieved RCTs and relevant reviews.  All relevant RCTs were retrieved and assessed to determine if they met the selection criteria.  Data extraction was independently performed by two investigators and followed by a discussion to reach consensus.  The main outcome measures were cancer outcome (survival and recurrence), quality of life (QoL), body composition and functional capacity.

Results

A total of 2,447 citations were identified of which 170 potentially relevant ones were examined in detail.  Forty-five papers met the selection criteria of which 41 reported data on at least one relevant outcome.  These encompassed 18 papers not included in previously published reviews.  Twenty-six papers (63.4%) were on breast cancers and the remaining papers were on other cancers.

There was a paucity of published data on the effects of physical activity interventions on cancer outcome.  Various instruments were used to assess the other outcomes (QoL and functional capacity) limiting the pooling of data for meta-analysis.  Estimates of the effects of physical activity interventions on QoL, body composition and functional capacity were determined.  Potential determinants of the effect heterogeneity across studies were evaluated.

Conclusion

Moderately-strong-to-strong evidence was found for a positive effect of physical activity interventions on QoL of adult cancer survivors following main cancer treatment.  Clinically meaningful associations were identified between such interventions and improved functional capacity.  The observed heterogeneity in study design and outcome parameters highlighted the need for the development of a standardized protocol to facilitate meta-analysis on the effects of physical activity in cancer survivors. 

Acknowledgements

This study has been supported by WCRF UK, WCRF International and WCRF Hong Kong.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI).</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference</relation.ispartof>
<title>Physical Activity Intervention in Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials</title>
<type>Conference_Paper</type>
<identifier.hkuros>187135</identifier.hkuros>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
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