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Article: English metalanguage awareness among primary school teachers In Hong Kong

TitleEnglish metalanguage awareness among primary school teachers In Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsGrammar
Metalanguage awareness
Primary english teacher
Issue Date2011
PublisherPerbit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ukm.my/ppbl/Gema/gemahome.html
Citation
GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies, 2011, v. 11 n. 1, p. 1-16 How to Cite?
AbstractWith the introduction of the English Language Proficiency Assessment for Teachers in Hong Kong, local English teachers' performance in the assessment has been in the spotlight. Among the five papers in the assessment, teachers' scores for the writing paper, a composite of two tasks-expository writing and error correction and explanation, have consistently recorded the lowest since the implementation. One recurrent comment is teachers' insufficient understanding and use of metalinguistic terminology. It is against this background that the present study was conducted. It aimed to explore the extent to which local English teachers in primary schools were aware of English metalinguistic terms at different structural levels. 20 in-service primary English teachers participated in an English grammar metalanguage test, modelled on Andrews (1999), and their performance revealed three key patterns: (1) the lowest mean score in the explanation component, (2) recognition of examples of grammatical functions being much harder than that of grammatical forms, and (3) errors at the word level being more readily to be corrected and explained than those at the phrasal and clausal levels. Their performance also suggested one possible discrepancy between primary English teachers and the secondary counterparts, where the primary teachers were better at the lower level of metalanguage application (e.g., recognition of examples for metalinguistic terms) and the secondary teachers at higher-level applications (e.g., error correction). The paper concludes with a suggestion that systematic micro-metalinguistic input be integrated in teacher training courses and be used more actively among in-service teachers in their teaching context.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136353
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.305
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, WLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:14:06Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:14:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGEMA Online Journal of Language Studies, 2011, v. 11 n. 1, p. 1-16en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1675-8021en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136353-
dc.description.abstractWith the introduction of the English Language Proficiency Assessment for Teachers in Hong Kong, local English teachers' performance in the assessment has been in the spotlight. Among the five papers in the assessment, teachers' scores for the writing paper, a composite of two tasks-expository writing and error correction and explanation, have consistently recorded the lowest since the implementation. One recurrent comment is teachers' insufficient understanding and use of metalinguistic terminology. It is against this background that the present study was conducted. It aimed to explore the extent to which local English teachers in primary schools were aware of English metalinguistic terms at different structural levels. 20 in-service primary English teachers participated in an English grammar metalanguage test, modelled on Andrews (1999), and their performance revealed three key patterns: (1) the lowest mean score in the explanation component, (2) recognition of examples of grammatical functions being much harder than that of grammatical forms, and (3) errors at the word level being more readily to be corrected and explained than those at the phrasal and clausal levels. Their performance also suggested one possible discrepancy between primary English teachers and the secondary counterparts, where the primary teachers were better at the lower level of metalanguage application (e.g., recognition of examples for metalinguistic terms) and the secondary teachers at higher-level applications (e.g., error correction). The paper concludes with a suggestion that systematic micro-metalinguistic input be integrated in teacher training courses and be used more actively among in-service teachers in their teaching context.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPerbit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ukm.my/ppbl/Gema/gemahome.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGEMA Online Journal of Language Studiesen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectGrammaren_HK
dc.subjectMetalanguage awarenessen_HK
dc.subjectPrimary english teacheren_HK
dc.titleEnglish metalanguage awareness among primary school teachers In Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, WL: tsangwl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, WL=rp01136en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651406382en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186164en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78651406382&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage16en_HK
dc.publisher.placeMalaysia-

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