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Conference Paper: Influence of English donor word stress on tonal assignment in Cantonese loanwords: an acoustic account
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TitleInfluence of English donor word stress on tonal assignment in Cantonese loanwords: an acoustic account
 
AuthorsLai, WWS
Wang, D
Yan, N
Chan, V
Zhang, L
 
KeywordsLoanword phonology
Tone
Stress
Acoustic analysis
Cantonese
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherICPhS17.
 
CitationThe 17th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS17), Hong Kong, 17-21 August 2011. In Proceedings of ICPhS17, 2011, p. 1162-1165 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThis study aims to identify the relationship between tone and stress in Cantonese loanwords borrowed from English. Tonal patterns of 23 disyllabic and trisyllabic Cantonese loanwords corresponding to English donor words of 20 different stress patterns, and the tonal patterns of 23 unassimilated Cantonese loanwords exhausting the same set of 20 stress patterns were examined. Fundamental frequency characteristics of the vowels extracted from the loanwords produced by 15 native Cantonese speakers were analysed by using Praat. The average F0s were calculated in Matlab with the algorithm of autocorrelation, and the F0s of vowels corresponding to stressed and unstressed/epenthetic vowels were compared with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. Acoustic results reveal that Cantonese loanword syllables corresponding to stressed syllables in the English donor words were assigned high-level tone whereas epenthetic syllables and those corresponding to unstressed syllables were usually assigned low-level or low-falling tone, and highrising tone for word-final syllables. This is consistent with previous findings proving the explicit correlation between English lexical stress and high tone, and that between English lexical non-stress and mid or low tones in Cantonese loanwords.
 
DescriptionRegular Session
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLai, WWS
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, D
 
dc.contributor.authorYan, N
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, V
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, L
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:12:30Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:12:30Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThis study aims to identify the relationship between tone and stress in Cantonese loanwords borrowed from English. Tonal patterns of 23 disyllabic and trisyllabic Cantonese loanwords corresponding to English donor words of 20 different stress patterns, and the tonal patterns of 23 unassimilated Cantonese loanwords exhausting the same set of 20 stress patterns were examined. Fundamental frequency characteristics of the vowels extracted from the loanwords produced by 15 native Cantonese speakers were analysed by using Praat. The average F0s were calculated in Matlab with the algorithm of autocorrelation, and the F0s of vowels corresponding to stressed and unstressed/epenthetic vowels were compared with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. Acoustic results reveal that Cantonese loanword syllables corresponding to stressed syllables in the English donor words were assigned high-level tone whereas epenthetic syllables and those corresponding to unstressed syllables were usually assigned low-level or low-falling tone, and highrising tone for word-final syllables. This is consistent with previous findings proving the explicit correlation between English lexical stress and high tone, and that between English lexical non-stress and mid or low tones in Cantonese loanwords.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.descriptionRegular Session
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 17th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS17), Hong Kong, 17-21 August 2011. In Proceedings of ICPhS17, 2011, p. 1162-1165 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage1165
 
dc.identifier.hkuros188116
 
dc.identifier.spage1162
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136298
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherICPhS17.
 
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong
 
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of ICPhS17
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectLoanword phonology
 
dc.subjectTone
 
dc.subjectStress
 
dc.subjectAcoustic analysis
 
dc.subjectCantonese
 
dc.titleInfluence of English donor word stress on tonal assignment in Cantonese loanwords: an acoustic account
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<item><contributor.author>Lai, WWS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wang, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yan, N</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, V</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhang, L</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-07-27T02:12:30Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-07-27T02:12:30Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>The 17th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS17), Hong Kong, 17-21 August 2011. In Proceedings of ICPhS17, 2011, p. 1162-1165</identifier.citation>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/136298</identifier.uri>
<description>Regular Session</description>
<description.abstract>This study aims to identify the relationship between tone and stress in Cantonese loanwords borrowed from English. Tonal patterns of 23 disyllabic and trisyllabic Cantonese loanwords corresponding to English donor words of 20 different stress patterns, and the tonal patterns of 23 unassimilated Cantonese loanwords exhausting the same set of 20 stress patterns were examined. Fundamental frequency characteristics of the vowels extracted from the loanwords produced by 15 native Cantonese speakers were analysed by using Praat. The average F0s were calculated in Matlab with the algorithm of autocorrelation, and the F0s of vowels corresponding to stressed and unstressed/epenthetic vowels were compared with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. Acoustic results reveal that Cantonese loanword syllables corresponding to stressed syllables in the English donor words were assigned high-level tone whereas epenthetic syllables and those corresponding to unstressed syllables were usually assigned low-level or low-falling tone, and highrising tone for word-final syllables. This is consistent with previous findings proving the explicit correlation between English lexical stress and high tone, and that between English lexical non-stress and mid or low tones in Cantonese loanwords.</description.abstract>
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<subject>Loanword phonology</subject>
<subject>Tone</subject>
<subject>Stress</subject>
<subject>Acoustic analysis</subject>
<subject>Cantonese</subject>
<title>Influence of English donor word stress on tonal assignment in Cantonese loanwords: an acoustic account</title>
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